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Length:

Width / OD:

Type / Shape:

File Set?

Cut Style (Tooth Type):

Pattern & Cut:

Help with Metal Files, Rasps, and Rifflers specifications:

Size
   Length       Length of the file is the length of the file excluding the tang or handle. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Width / OD       The file width is the dimension of the file's cutting or toothed flat surface. The width or the length of the edge would be the thickness of the file. The diameter of the file is the dimension used for round or oval files. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Shape / Type
   Type / Shape       
   Your choices are...         
   Aluminum       Aluminum files have a special tooth construction to eliminates loading or clogging when cutting aluminum alloys, soft steel and various non-ferrous metals. 
   Barrette       Barrette files are tapered in width and thickness, coming to a rounded point at the end. Only the longest flat side is cut, and the other sides are all safe. Used for doing flat work. 
   Cant / Cantsaw       Cant and cantsaw files have the cross sectional shape of a flat isosceles triangle tapering to a point. Cant files are double-cut on three faces and single cut on the two sharp edges. They are useful in finishing corners especially where a three square file will not fit such saw teeth. Sharpening of saw blades is a common application for cant files. 
   Checkering       Checkering files are parallel in width and gently tapered in thickness. They have teeth cut in a precise grid pattern for making serrations and doing gunstock checkering work. Checkering files are used by cutlers to put serrations on knife edges and by gunsmiths for forming checkered gun grips. 
   Crochet / Rounded Edge       Crochet files are tapered in width and gradually tapered in thickness, with two flats and radiused edges, cut all around. Used in filing junctions between flat and curved surface, and slots with rounded edges. 
   Crossing / Oval       Crossing files are half round on two sides with one side having a larger radius than the other. They are tapered in width and thickness, and are used for filing interior curved surfaces. The double radius makes possible filing at the junction of two curved surfaces or a straight and curved surface. 
   Die Makers       Die makers files are similar to die sinker files or riflers, but they are coarser with fewer teeth/cm for the same cut number. Die maker files or rifflers have thicker dimensions, longer middle sections, and different end shapes compared to die sinker files.  
   Die Sinkers       Die sinking files are specialized riffler files with contours for finishing, smoothing, metal removal and deburring hard to reach recesses and tight places in molds, dies, punches and tooling. Preferred by die sinkers, jewelers, and instrument makers because of the unique shapes. Die Sinker Rifflers are slender with narrow ends to maximize detail work. The middle section is safe (uncut) and each shape offers its own distinct advantage. Available individually or in assorted sets. Die maker files or rifflers have thicker dimensions, longer middle sections, and different end shapes compared to die sinker files 
   Equaling       Equalling files are parallel in width and thickness. Used for filing slots and corners. 
   Farmer's       Farmer's files are similar to hand files except they have an integral handle instead of a tang. 
   Farrier's / Horse       Farrier's files have a special tooth construction to eliminate loading or clogging when cutting hoof or horn materials. 
   Flat       The flat or mill files are rectangular in cross section and tapering in width from tang to end with a slight taper in thickness at the end. Mill files are all single-cut. Used when a smooth finish is required. Many applications include sharpening saws and tools, finishing metal, lathe work, draw filing and general workshop use. This common flat file is most often used by machinists, machinery builders and repair personnel when rapid material removal is required.  Double cut on top and bottom but single cut on sides. 
   Half Round       Half round ring files taper in width and thickness, coming to a point, and are narrower than a standard half round. They are used for filing inside of rings. 
   Hand / Pottance       Hand files have a rectangular cross section without a taper; i.e., they are parallel in width and thickness. The flats are parallel in width and thickness. Hand files are general purpose files. 
   Joint Round-Edge       Joint round edge files are parallel in width and thickness, with rounded edges. The flats are safe (no teeth) and cut on the rounded edges only. They are used for making joints and hinges. 
   Key / Locksmith       Key files are small tools commonly used on locks and keys. They are also useful for light, delicate filing tasks, especially in tool- and mould-making. Locksmiths, electricians, mechanics and precision workers use these files. They are commonly sold in sets. Key files have the precision of Swiss needle files with the ruggedness of American pattern files. 
   Knife       Knife files are tapered in width and thickness, but the knife edge has the same thickness across the whole length, with the knife edge having an arc to it. They are used for slotting or wedging operations. 
   Lathe (Long Angle Tooth)       Lathe files have teeth cut on a long angle and are used while finishing a rotating part on a lathe or bench. Long angle lathe files are single cut with both edges safe (uncut) and a taper toward the point in width. The teeth are designed on a "long angle" to provide free cutting and rapid filing while leaving a smooth finish. 
   Machine       Machine files are designed to be used in a filing machine. Machine files are held in the filing machine with a set screw in a manner to similar the way the saw blades are held in scroll saw or jigsaw machines. The filing machine vertically reciprocates the machine file while the workpiece is presented to the file's face and manipulated around the table/file as the shape requires. While filing machines can reduce fatigue and improve product accuracy, they are not usually seen in modern production environments. 
   Machinist       Machinist files are generally double-cut, short files. Machinist files are excellent for rough filing, rapid metal cutting or hogging on all types of ferrous and nonferrous materials. Machinist files are used by machinists, fitters and mobile tradespersons. 
   Mill       Mill files are rectangular in cross section and tapering slightly in width and thickness. Mill files are all single-cut and are used when a smooth finish is required after roughing or hogging off with a hand or flat file.  Many applications include sharpening saws and tools, finishing metal, lathe work, draw filing and general workshop use. They are single cut, two square edges that are tapered and have teeth. The name "mill file" arose from their most common use in sharpening saws in lumber mills many years ago.    This common flat file is most often used by machinists, machinery builders and repair personnel when rapid material removal is required. They are double cut on top and bottom but single cut on sides. 
   Needle       Needle files are small files with integral metal handles. Needle files are used for fine precision work (instruments, clocks, watches, settings, etc.) where the surface finish generated in more important than the metal removal rate. Needle file sets with a variety of shapes are common. 
   Pillar / Keyway       Pillars are rectangular double cut or cross-cut files with a safe (uncut) edge and a single cut edge. Typically, pillar files are thicker relative to their width than other flat files. They taper in thickness from the tang to the end. Finishing or cutting keyways is a common application of these files.  
   Pippin       Pippin files are tapered in width and thickness, generally of a teardrop cross section and having the edge of a knife file. They are used for filing the junction of two curved surfaces and making V-shaped slots. 
   Riffler       Riffler files are small to medium sized files in an assortment of cross sectional shapes and profiles. The varying profiles and shapes enable them to be used in hard to reach, or unusually shaped areas. They are often used as an intermediate step in die making where the surface finish of a cavity die may need to be improved. 
   Round       Round files, also called rat-tail files, are gradually tapered and are used for many tasks that require a round tool, such as enlarging round holes or cutting a scalloped edge. 
   Round Parallel / Gullet       Gullet or round parallel files are similar to round files, except that they do not taper. Shaped like a toothed cylinder. Round parallel files are often used to sharpen chainsaw teeth. 
   Three Square (Triangular)       Three square or triangular files have an equilateral triangular cross-section, usually with a gradual taper from tang to end.  Three square files are double-cut on three faces and single cut on the edges. Smaller three square files often taper to a point. Three square files are used for many finishing dies, holes and corners and cutting angles less than 90 degrees. They are often employed for sharpening the teeth of wood saws. 
   Saw / Sharpening       Saw files are used to sharpen teeth of saw blades. Specific saw files are configured for sharpening chainsaw teeth, handsaw teeth and circular saw blade teeth. 
   Slitting / Feather Edge (Diamond Shape)       Slitting files are parallel in width with a diamond shaped cross section. They are thinner than knife files and use for filing slots. 
   Square       Square files are gradually tapered and cut on all four sides. They are used for a wide variety of applications. 
   Plastic / Veneer       Plastic and veneer files are flat files with a tooth shape designed for cutting plastics and laminates such as Formica®. They are used for light trimming, deburring and chamfering work in edge applications where power tools cannot be used or are not cost effective. 
   Warding       Warding files have a rectangular cross-section that tapers in width from the tang to the point. Typically, pillar files are thinner relative to their width than other flat files. The sides or flats are parallel and double cut, while both edges are single cut. They are well suited for filing slots, locks and keyways and removal of burrs after milling operations. 
   Wax File       Specialized files for filing and carving wax or wax foundry patterns. Wax files are designed to resist loading with the soft wax material. 
   Welders File       Welder's files are designed for cleaning nozzles, weld tips, weld deposits and/or welding torches. 
   Wood       Wood rasps and files have tooth constructions to eliminate loading or clogging when cutting soft wood materials. 
   Specialty / Other       Other specialized, proprietary, unlisted, or patented file type or shape. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   File Set       Product consists of a set of different types of files. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Cut Style (Teeth Type)
   Cut Style (Tooth Type)       
   Your choices are...         
   Single Cut       A single-cut file has a single set of parallel, diagonal rows of teeth. Single-cut files are often used with light pressure to produce a smooth surface finish or to put a keen edge on knives, shears or saw teeth. 
   Double Cut (Cross Cut)       A double-cut file has two sets of diagonal rows of teeth. The second set of teeth is cut in the opposite diagonal direction, and on top of the first set. The first set of teeth is known as the overcut while the second is called the upcut. The upcut is finer than the overcut. The double-cut file is used with heavier pressure than the single-cut and removes material faster from the workpiece. 
   Curved-Cut / Mill Tooth       A curved-cut or mill tooth file has its teeth arranged in curved contours across the file face and is normally used in for smoothing automotive body panels, body fillers, polymer composites, adhesive, and soft plastics. 
   Rasp-cut       A rasp-cut has a series of individual teeth that are formed by a single-pointed tool. This produces a rough cut and is used primarily on wood, hooves, aluminum and lead. 
   Chip Breaker / Segmented (e.g., Magicut®)       Rows of teeth are segmented with grooves running perpendicular to the teeth. The grooves or serrations allow files to free themselves of filings, which is useful on soft metals like aluminum, brass and copper. 
   Shaver / "Grater" (e.g., Surform®, Microplane®)       Shaver or surface forming tools have a grater like appearance where a perforated sheet has raised teeth formed from the rims of holes. The edges can be sharpened through conventional or chemical milling means. The strips are mounted into carriage or handle. Surform® and Microplane® are common brands of these perforated shaver type files. 
   Undercut (e.g., Millenicut®, IWASAKI®)       File teeth with an undercut type tooth, which greatly reduced loading and improves filing of soft metals like aluminum, brass and copper. 
   Combination       File with a combination of teeth on different surfaces such as products with a rasp on one end and second cut on another end. 
   Specialty / Other       Other specialized, proprietary, unlisted or patented file cut type or tooth shape. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Pattern & Cut (Coarseness)
   Pattern & Cut      Coarseness is determined by the number of teeth per inch length of the file.  The cut is the character of the file teeth with respect to the coarseness with bastard, second cut and smooth are cut types for American pattern files. The actual coarseness of a file varies with cut and length. For example, the degree of coarseness is greater in a longer file with the same cut.
   Your choices are...         
   American - Bastard       Bastard cut is the roughest or most coarse cut of the American pattern type files. 
   American - Second Cut       Second cut is the intermediate or medium cut of the American pattern type files. 
   American - Smooth Cut       Smooth cut is the finest cut of the American pattern type files. 
   Swiss - 000       Swiss pattern file with a 000 cut. Coarsest of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 000 cut files typically have 9 to 16 teeth/cm depending on the length and file type. 
   Swiss - 00       Swiss pattern file with a 00 cut. Second coarsest of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 00 cut files typically have 12 to 20 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 0       Swiss pattern file with a 0 cut. Third coarsest of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 0 cut files typically have 16 to 25 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 1       Swiss pattern file with a 1 cut. Fourth coarsest of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 1 cut files typically have 20 to 31 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 2       Swiss pattern file with a 2 cut. 5th in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 2 cut files typically have 25 to 38 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 3       Swiss pattern file with an 3 cut. Sixth in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 3 cut files typically have 31 to 46 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 4       Swiss pattern file with an 4 cut. Fifth in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 4 cut files typically have 38 to 56 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 5       Swiss pattern file with a 5 cut. Fourth in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 5 cut files typically have 46 to 68 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 6       Swiss pattern file with a 6 cut. Third in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 6 cut files typically have 56 to 84 teeth/cm depending on length and file type. 
   Swiss - 7       Swiss pattern file with a 7 cut. Second in smoothness of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 7 cut files typically have 100 teeth/cm. 
   Swiss - 8       Swiss pattern file with an 8 cut. Smoothest of the Swiss pattern files. Swiss 8 cut files typically have 116 teeth/cm. 
   Coarse       File, rasp, riffler or shaver (Surform® and Microplane®) with a coarse cut, tooth or perforation pattern, which will cut faster and produce a rougher finish. 
   Medium       File, rasp, riffler or shaver (Surform® and Microplane®) with a medium cut, tooth or perforation pattern, which will cut and finish at an intermediate level between coarse and fine products. 
   Fine       File, rasp, riffler or shaver (Surform® and Microplane®) with a fine cut, tooth or perforation pattern, which will cut slower and produce a smoother finish. 
   Specialty / Other       Other specialized, proprietary, unlisted or patented file cut type. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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