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Type:

Amplifier Class:

Frequency Response:

Output Gain:

dB

Power:

Number of Channels:

#

Nominal Impedance:

Help with Audio Amplifiers and Preamplifiers specifications:

Type
           
   Your choices are...         
   Amplifier       Audio amplifiers take low-power audio signals and amplify the signal for speakers. 
   Preamplifier       Preamplifiers are used to prepare small signals for continued amplification. 
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Amplifier Class
           
   Your choices are...         
   Class A       Class A amplifier designs are output stage devices that pass currents at all times, even when the input stage is idle. Since the output stages are always "active", presence of an input signal causes output current to be diverted directly to the loudspeakers. The slew rate is very quick and there is only a small delay between the introduction of signal at the amplifier's inputs and outputs. If all stages of the amplifier are biased in Class A mode, and the amplifier produces all currents at its output, regardless of input signal. Because of the full-bias-current-on state of Class A amplifiers, they are the most inefficient of all designs; however, Class A amplifiers are the most linear. 
   Class B       Class B operations are essentially the opposite of Class A operation. No currents flow when the output devices are idle, and thus must turn on from a zero-current state when signal is present. In addition, both output devices (negative and positive) are never active at the same time. If given a sine wave, each output device will operate for half the waveform. Thus, the Class B operation is very efficient; however, the linearity of the amplifier suffers when the signal approaches the point at which the output devices change. Class B operation amplifiers are not generally used for professional audio equipment, and are reserved for low-power operations such as radios. 
   Class AB       AB amplifiers are a combination of Class A and Class B operations. An amplifier is said to be in Class AB operation if the amplifier operates in Class A for part of its output, and turns on an additional current for the rest of its output. The amplifier's slew rate is slower in Class AB operations than in Class A because there is a measurable length of time between the appearance of input signal and the appearance of output signal. The Class AB amplifier type is the most popular due to its increased efficiency and excellent linearity. 
   Class C       Class C amplifiers are used for radio-frequency transmissions. This class is similar to Class B operations in that each output stage device (negative, positive) is turned on for less than one-half cycle, and pulsed on and off through the duration of the half-cycle. Class C amplifiers can produce large amounts of output power, although the distortion is great. RF circuitry has been developed and tuned to alleviate the effects of this distortion. 
   Class D       Class D refers to an amplifier design that is also switched. The output devices are switched on and off at least twice per cycle. Because the output devices (negative and positive) are completely on or completely off, no power is dissipated. Real-life Class D amplifiers are not 100% efficient, but approach 90%. 
   Other Class       The amplifier is a specialty/other type of class. 
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Specifications
   Frequency Response       The frequency range the amplifier 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Output Gain       The output gain of the amplifier 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Power       The continuous power of the amplifier 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Number of Channels       the number of channels the amplifier contains 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Nominal Impedance       The nominal impedance of the amplifier 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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