See All Suppliers In This Area
Fill out as many options as you want. Click "Run Search Filter" at any time.

Measurement Range:

Resolution:

Sampling Frequency:

Accuracy:

%

Linearity:

±% Full Scale

Operating Temperature:

Time of Flight Technique:

Visible beam:

Scan Field:

Source:

Output:

Interface:

Laser Safety FDA Class:

Laser Safety IEC Class:

Help with Time of Flight Optical Sensors specifications:

Specifications
   Measurement Range       Range of distance measurement, or maximum distance measured. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Resolution       Smallest unit of magnitude or distinction for the measurement. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Sampling Frequency       The sampling frequency is the number of times the sensor can take a measurement within a period of time. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Accuracy       Accuracy describes the percent deviation from the actual/real value of the measurement. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Linearity       Linearity is the maximum deviation from direct proportionality between the distance measured and the output distance over the measuring range. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operating Temperature       The temperature range over which the device must operate. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
Back to Top
Time of Flight Technique
           
   Your choices are...         
   Continuous Wave       Time of flight sensors derive range from the time it takes light to travel from the sensor to the target and return. Some methods time a single round trip directly, and others use other techniques to calculate the range from many cycles of light. 
   Pulsed       For very long range distance measurements (up to many miles) time of flight laser range-finders use pulsed laser beams. The laser emits very brief, very intense pulses of light. The amount of time the pulse takes to reach the target and return is measured and converted to a distance measurement. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Visible beam       
   Your choices are...         
   Visible beam       The sensor beam is visible to the naked eye. 
   Search Logic:      Products with the selected attribute will be returned as matches. Leaving or selecting "No Preference" will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Optical
   Scan Field       
   Your choices are...         
   Point / 1-Dimentional       Measurement is made by reflection of single-point beam. 
   Line / 2-Dimentional       Several point sources are used in a line for simultaneous measurement; used in line "scanning." 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Source       
   Your choices are...         
   LED       Light-emitting diode (LED) source for measurement. 
   Laser       Laser light source for measurement. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Electrical
   Output       
   Your choices are...         
   Voltage       Output voltage is a simple (usually linear) function of the measurement. 
   Current       Often called a transmitter. A current is imposed on the output circuit proportional to the measurement. Feedback is used to provide the appropriate current regardless of line noise, impedance, etc. Useful when sending signals over long distances. 
   Frequency       The output signal is encoded via amplitude modulation (AM), frequency modulation (FM), or some other modulation scheme, but the signal is still analog in nature. 
   Resistance       An output consisting of a simple change in resistance, typically for a magnetoresistive device. 
   Switched / Alarm       An "output" of a change in state of switches or alarms. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Interface       
   Your choices are...         
   Serial       A standard digital output protocol (serial) such as RS232, etc. 
   Parallel       A standard digital output protocol (parallel) such as IEEE488, etc. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Laser Safety Class http://www.fda.gov/radiation-emittingproducts/radiationemittingproductsandprocedures/homebusinessandentertainment/laserproductsandinstruments/default.htm  
   Laser Safety FDA Class       
   Your choices are...         
   Class I       Considered non-hazardous. Hazard increases if viewed with optical aids, including magnifiers, binoculars, or telescopes. 
   Class II/IIa       Hazard increases when viewed directly for long periods of time. Hazard increases if viewed with optical aids. 
   Class IIIa       Depending on power and beam area, can be momentarily hazardous when directly viewed or when staring directly at the beam with an unaided eye. Risk of injury increases when viewed with optical aids. 
   Class IIIb       Immediate skin hazard from direct beam and immediate eye hazard when viewed directly. 
   Class IV       Immediate skin hazard and eye hazard from exposure to either the direct or reflected beam; may also present a fire hazard. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Laser Safety IEC Class       
   Your choices are...         
   Class 1/1M       Considered non-hazardous. Hazard increases if viewed with optical aids, including magnifiers, binoculars, or telescopes. 
   Class 2/2M       Hazard increases when viewed directly for long periods of time. Hazard increases if viewed with optical aids. 
   Class 3R       Depending on power and beam area, can be momentarily hazardous when directly viewed or when staring directly at the beam with an unaided eye. Risk of injury increases when viewed with optical aids. 
   Class 3B       Immediate skin hazard from direct beam and immediate eye hazard when viewed directly. 
   Class 4       Immediate skin hazard and eye hazard from exposure to either the direct or reflected beam; may also present a fire hazard. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top