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Mounting Type:

Analyzer Type:

Test Type:

Analysis Type:

Frequency Range:

Frequency Accuracy:

Frequency Resolution:

Number of Input Channels:

Dynamic Range:

dB

Number of Output Channels:

Markers?

Limit Lines?

Zero Span?

Noise Marker?

Video Averaging?

Self-Calibration Routines?

Trigger Modes?

Battery Powered?

User Interface:

Connection to Host:

Floppy Disk?

CD Drive?

Tape Drive / Backup?

Display Options:

Operating Temperature:

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Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Operating Humidity:

%
Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
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Help with Spectrum Analyzers and Signal Analyzers specifications:

Physical Specifications
   Mounting Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Handheld       Specifically for using while holding in one hand. 
   Portable/Benchtop       Has handles/case/wheels etc. to make easy to move, not necessarily held in hand to use. 
   Fixed       Meant to be fixed or used in one place. For example, benchtop, panel mount etc. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Analyzer Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Instrument       A stand-alone analyzer. 
   PC-Based       A black box; has no integral display or interface and must be interfaced with a computer for use. 
   Other       Any unlisted analyzer type. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Environment
   Operating Temperature:       This is the full required range of ambient operating temperature. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operating Humidity:       This is the full required range of ambient operating humidity. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Analyzer Configuration
   Test Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Modulation       Measuring the quality of the modulation is important for making sure a system is working properly and that the information is being transmitted correctly.  Understanding the spectral content is important, especially in communications where there is very limited bandwidth.  The amount of power being transmitted (for example, to overcome the channel impairments in wireless systems) is another key measurement in communications.  Tests such as modulation degree, sideband amplitude, modulation quality, and occupied bandwidth are examples of common modulation measurements. 
   Distortion       In communications, measuring distortion is critical for both the receiver and transmitter.  Excessive harmonic distortion at the output of a transmitter can interfere with other communication bands. The pre-amplification stages in a receiver must be free of intermodulation distortion to prevent signal crosstalk.  An example is the intermodulation of cable TV carriers that moves down the trunk of the distribution system and distorts other channels on the same cable.  Common distortion measurements include intermodulation, harmonics, and spurious emissions. 
   Noise       Because any active circuit or device will generate noise it is an important parameter to measure.  Tests such as noise figure and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) are important for characterizing the performance of a device and/or its contribution to overall system noise. 
   Other       Any unlisted configuration type. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Analysis Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Fast Fourier Transform (FFT)       The Fourier analyzer basically takes a time-domain signal, digitizes it using digital sampling, and then performs the mathematics required to convert it to the frequency domain, and display the resulting spectrum.  It is as if the analyzer is looking at the entire frequency range at the same time using parallel filters measuring simultaneously.  It is actually capturing the time-domain information, which contains all the frequency information in it.  With its real-time signal analysis capability, the Fourier analyzer is able to capture periodic as well as random and transient events.  It also can provide significant speed improvement over the more traditional swept analyzer and can measure phase as well as magnitude.  However it does have its limitations, particularly in the areas of frequency range, sensitivity, and dynamic range.  Fourier analyzers are becoming more prevalent, as analog-to-digital converters (ADC) and digital signal processing (DSP) technologies advance.  Operations that once required a lot of custom, power-hungry discrete hardware can now be performed with commercial off-the-shelf DSP chips, which get smaller and faster every year.  These analyzers can offer significant performance improvements over conventional spectrum analyzers, but often with a price premium. 
   Swept-Tuned       The most common type of spectrum analyzer is the swept-tuned receiver.   It is the most widely accepted, general-purpose tool for frequency-domain measurements.  The technique most widely used is superheterodyne.  Heterodyne means to mix - that is, to translate frequency - and super refers to super-audio frequencies, or frequencies above the audio range.  Very basically, these analyzers "sweep" across the frequency range of interest, displaying all the frequency components present.  The swept-tuned analyzer works just like an AM, except that on the radio, the dial controls the tuning and instead of a display, a radio has a speaker.  The swept receiver technique enables frequency domain measurements to be made over a large dynamic range and a wide frequency range, thereby making significant contributions to frequency-domain signal analysis for numerous applications, including the manufacture and maintenance of microwave communications links, radar, telecommunications equipment, cable TV systems, and broadcast equipment; mobile communication systems; EMI diagnostic testing; component testing; and signal surveillance.  
   Other       Any unlisted analysis type. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Frequency Performance Specifications
   Frequency Range:       It is important that a spectrum analyzer will cover the fundamental frequencies of the application, as well as harmonics or spurious signals on the high end, or baseband and IF on the low end. An example of needing higher frequency capability is in wireless communications.  Some of the cellular standards require that you measure out to the tenth harmonic of your system.  If you're working at 900 MHz, that means you need an analyzer that has a high frequency of 10 * 900 MHz = 9 GHz.  Also, this refers to RF analyzers, it is necessary the analyzer be able to measure the lower frequency baseband and IF signals as well. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Frequency Accuracy:       Frequency accuracy is often listed under the Frequency Readout Accuracy specification and is usually specified as the sum of several sources of errors, including frequency-reference inaccuracy, span error, and RBW center-frequency error.  Frequency-reference accuracy is determined by the basic architecture of the analyzer.  The quality of the instrument's internal timebase is also a factor, however, many spectrum analyzers use an ovenized, high-performance crystal oscillator as a standard or optional component, so this term is small. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
   Frequency Resolution:       Resolution is an important specification when trying to measure signals that are close together and need to be distinguishable from each other.  The IF filter bandwidth is also known as the resolution bandwidth (RBW).  This is because it is the IF filter bandwidth and shape that determines the resolvability between signals. In addition to filter bandwidth, the selectivity, filter type, residual FM, and noise sidebands are factors to consider in determining useful resolution.  
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
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Input and Output Specifications
   Number of Input Channels:       Maximum number of all analog input channels, general and specific types. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Dynamic Range:       Dynamic Range is defined as the maximum ratio of two signal levels simultaneously present at the input, which can be measured to a specified accuracy.  Imagine connecting two signals to the analyzer input - one that is the maximum allowable level for the analyzer's input  range and the other which is much smaller.  The smaller one is reduced in amplitude until it is no longer detectable by the analyzer.  When the smaller signal is just measurable, the ratio of the two signal levels (in dB) defines the dynamic range of the analyzer.  
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Number of Output Channels:       Maximum number of all analog output channels, general and specific types. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Operation Features
   Markers?       Markers allow the user to quickly and accurately find the amplitude and frequency of signal peaks, and determine the differences between peaks.  
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Limit Lines?       Modern spectrum analyzers provide electronic limit-line capability.  This allows the user to compare trace data to a set of amplitude and frequency (or time) parameters while the spectrum analyzer is sweeping the measurement range. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Zero Span?       Allows the user to view the spectrum in a time domain.  This is useful for determining modulation type or for demodulation. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Noise Marker?       By choosing Noise Marker as opposed to a normal marker, the value displayed is the equivalent value in a 1-Hz noise power bandwidth. When the noise marker is selected, the sample detection mode is used (best for noise), several trace elements about the marker are averaged, a correction factor is applied to account for detection, bw, and log amp effects, and this value is then normalized to the 1 Hz bw. (correction factor - analyzer designed to measure sinusoids, need to correct for internal effects that make noise measurements inaccurate.) 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Video Averaging?       This is a digital averaging of a spectrum analyzer's trace information and is only available on analyzers with digital displays.  The averaging is done at each point of the display independently and is completed over the number of sweeps selected. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Self-Calibration Routines?       Most analyzers available today have self-calibration routines, which may be manual or automatic.  These routines generate error-coefficients (for example, amplitude changes versus resolution bandwidth) that the analyzer uses later to correct measured data.  As a result, these self-calibration routines allow for good amplitude measurements with a spectrum analyzer and give the user more freedom to change controls during the course of a measurement. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Trigger Modes?       Trigger mode refers to when data acquisition begins and ends in relationship to the trigger. Trigger modes include normal-trigger, pre-trigger, post-trigger, etc. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Battery Powered?       Batteries for full operation, not just backup 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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User Interface
   User Interface       
   Your choices are...         
   None       No user input or programmability; "black box" style of storage for download or processing elsewhere. 
   Front Panel & Display       Integral controls, keypad, and/or display on the panel of the unit. 
   Touch Screen       The device's visual display screen is contact sensitive to allow direct input. 
   Hand-held / Remote Programmer       Interface unit specifically meant to hold in hand while entering program parameters; may include remote programming. 
   Computer Programmable       Computers can be used to directly control the operation of spectrum analyzers over GPIB.  Computers can also be used to develop downloadable programs (DLPs) for spectrum analyzers.  The analyzer can then store these programs in non-volatile memory.  These custom measurement routines are then as easy to use as any of the standard instrument features.  Custom measurement "personality" cards are available for many spectrum analyzers  for making measurements such as noise figure, phase noise, and several digital communications tests, far faster and easier. In addition, spectrum analyzers with a parallel printer interface can directly control a printer, enabling a hard copy of the LCD display to be made without the use of a computer.   Analyzers with GPIB capability can easily be used with the addition of a GPIB to parallel converter. Application areas that require accurate, high-speed, repetitive routines; physical separation of the operator and the analyzer; unattended operation or operation by personnel with limited technical skills - all are candidates for automation.   
   Other       Any unlisted user interface method. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Connection to Host
   Connection to Host       
   Your choices are...         
   Direct Backplane Interface       The circuit board installs directly into a computer motherboard or backplane. 
   RS232       Interface between data terminal equipment and data communications equipment employing serial binary data interchange. 
   RS422       RS422 is a balanced serial interface for the transmission of digital data. It was designed for greater distances and higher Baud rates than RS232. 
   RS485       RS485 is a balanced serial interface for the transmission of digital data. The advantage of a balanced signal is the greater immunity to noise. The difference between RS422 and RS485 is that RS485 can be transformed into a multi-point application. 
   USB       Universal Serial Bus. The standard serial bus for low-to-medium speed peripheral device connections to Personal Computers, including keyboards, mice, modems, printers, joysticks, audio functions, monitor controls, etc. 
   IEEE 1394 (Firewire®)       A companion to USB, IEEE 1394 is a very high-speed serial bus (400 Megabit - 1 Gigabit). It was designed to replace all external high-speed peripheral connections to personal computers, including hard disks, CD-ROM's, DVD's, graphics cards, high-speed scanners, direct video, monitors, etc. 
   GPIB (IEEE 488, HPIB)       GPIB (General Purpose Interface Bus) is designed to connect computers, peripherals and laboratory instruments so that data and control information can pass between them. It is also known as IEEE 488 or HPIB, and is electrically equivalent to IEC 625 bus. 
   SCSI       SCSI (Small Computer System Interface) is a parallel interface standard used by Apple Macintosh computers, PCs, and many UNIX systems for attaching peripheral devices to computers. 
   Digital Interface       CMOS, ECL and TTL.  Transistor-transistor logic, a common type of digital circuit in which the output is derived from two transistors. More commonly, however, TTL is used to designate any type of digital input or device. 
   Parallel Interface       A channel capable of transferring more than one bit simultaneously; parallel communication protocols include GPIB / IEEE-488 / HPIB Protocol. 
   Ethernet       A local-area network (LAN) protocol developed by Xerox Corporation in cooperation with DEC and Intel in 1976. Ethernet uses a bus or star topology and supports data transfer rates of 10 Mbps. The Ethernet specification served as the basis for the IEEE 802.3 standard, which specifies the physical and lower software layers. Ethernet uses the CSMA/CD access method to handle simultaneous demands. It is one of the most widely implemented LAN standards. 
   Modem       Modulator-demodulator. A modem is a device or program that enables a computer to transmit data over telephone lines. Computer information is stored digitally, whereas information transmitted over telephone lines is transmitted in the form of analog waves. A modem converts between these two forms. 
   Radio / Telemetry       Communication from data acquisition device to host or storage unit via radio transmission. 
   Other       Unlisted, specialized, or proprietary communication configuration. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Memory and Storage
   Floppy Disk?       5¼" floppy or 3½"diskette 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   CD Drive?       Compact Disc drive for loading programs or data storage. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Tape Drive / Backup?       Tape drive for data storage or backup. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Display Options
   Display Options:       
   Your choices are...         
   Analog Meter       Data is displayed with an analog meter or simple visual indicator. 
   Digital Readout       Device uses numerical or application specific display. 
   Video Display       The data is presented in video form via CRT, LCD, or other multi-line forms. 
   None       No integral display. Output is read and displayed remotely. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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