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Image Sensor Type:

Array Type:

Optical Format:

Horizontal Pixels:

Vertical Pixels:

Pixel Size:

Spectral Response:

Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Data Rate:

Quantum Efficiency:

%

Dynamic Range:

Number of Outputs:

Antiblooming?

Cooled?

Operating Temperature:

Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Help with CCD Image Sensors specifications:

Image Sensor Type
           
   Your choices are...         
   Color       A color CCD image sensor.  An integral RGB color filter array provides color responsivity and separation. 
   Monochrome       A black and white CCD image sensor. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Array Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Linear Array       Linear arrays consist of a single line of pixels. 
   Frame Transfer Area Array       Frame transfer CCDs are built with MOS capacitors that serve as sensing elements, as well as comprise the parallel and serial shift registers.  Light is integrated in the photosites of the imaging region.  After a period of integration, i.e. 1/60 of a second for video applications, the charge is quickly transferred down the shift register and into the CCD's storage region, another integration period can begin.  The storage region of the frame transfer CCD makes it faster and more expensive than the full frame CCD.  
   Full Frame Area Array       Full frame CCD imager does not have a storage region, making it half the size of frame transfer type CCDs.  With half the silicon area, the price is proportionally less than frame transfer designs.  The disadvantage is that because there is no storage region, the entire image must be read out of the array before the next image can be acquired. 
   Interline Transfer Area Array       Interline transfer CCD imagers can control the start / stop of when it measures light falling on it, otherwise known as an electronic shutter, it does so by shifting values out of the photodiodes into "shift registers" then pushing all of that data out as a final image. 
   Other         
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Optical Format:      Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.
   Your choices are...         
   1/7 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/7 inch. 
   1/6 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/6 inch. 
   1/5 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/5 inch. 
   1/4 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/4 inch. 
   1/3 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/3 inch. 
   1/2 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1/2 inch. 
   2/3 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 2/3 inch. 
   3/4 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 3/4 inch. 
   1 inch       Digital imaging optical format is a measure of the size of the imaging area.  Optical format is used to determine what size lens is necessary for use with the imager.  Optical format refers to the length of the diagonal of the imaging area.  The optical format is 1 inch. 
   Other       Any other optical format not listed. 
   Search Logic:      Products with the selected attribute will be returned as matches. Leaving or selecting "No Preference" will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Horizontal Pixels:       The number of pixels in a row of the image sensor.  The greater the number of pixels, the better the resolution.  For example, VGA resolution is (640x480), this means the number of horizontal pixels is 640 and the number of vertical pixels are 480. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Vertical Pixels:       The number of pixels in a column of the image sensor.  The greater the number of pixels, the better the resolution.  For example, VGA resolution is (640x480), this means the number of horizontal pixels is 640 and the number of vertical pixels are 480. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Pixel Size:       The largest dimension of the pixel.  Pixels are usually square but can sometimes be rectangular. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
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Image Sensor Performance
   Spectral Response:       The spectral range (wavelength range) for which the detector is designed. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Data Rate:       The speed of a data transfer process, normally expressed in MHz. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Quantum Efficiency:       The ratio of photon-generated electrons that the pixel captures to the photons incident on the pixel area.  This value is wavelength dependent so the given value for quantum efficiency is generally for the peak sensitivity wavelength for the CCD. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Dynamic Range:       Dynamic Range is the logarithmic ratio of well depth to the readout noise in decibels.  The higher the number, the better. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   Number of Outputs:         
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Features
   Antiblooming?       Some arrays offer an optional anti-blooming gate designed to bleed off overflow from a saturated pixel.  With out this feature, a bright spot which has saturated the pixels will cause a vertical streak.  
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Cooled?       Some arrays are cooled for lower noise and higher sensitivity. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Environment
   Operating Temperature:       This is the full required range of ambient operating temperature. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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