Seeing through silicon
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, 6 hours ago
Scientists at MIT and the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA) have developed a new type of microscopy that can image cells through a silicon wafer, allowing them to precisely measure the size and mechanical behavior of cells behind the wafer.The new technology, which relies on near-infrared light...
One-two punch knocks out aggressive tumors
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, 6 hours ago
An aggressive form of breast cancer known as "triple negative" is very difficult to treat: Chemotherapy can shrink such tumors for a while, but in many patients they grow back and gain resistance to the original drugs. To overcome that resistance, MIT chemical engineers have designed nanoparticles t...
Department of Chemical Engineering establishes new professorship
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, October 15, 2014
The Department of Chemical Engineering is pleased to announce the establishment of its Raymond F. Baddour (1949) Chemical Engineering Professorship, which will support a distinguished faculty member in the department. Baddour, the Lammot du Pont Professor Emeritus of Chemical Engineer...
High-speed drug screen
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, September 29, 2014
MIT engineers have devised a way to rapidly test hundreds of different drug-delivery vehicles in living animals, making it easier to discover promising new ways to deliver a class of drugs called biologics, which includes antibodies, peptides, RNA, and DNA, to human patients. In a study appearing in...
Resistance is futile
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
Cisplatin is a chemotherapy drug given to more than half of all cancer patients. The drug kills cells very effectively by damaging nuclear DNA, but if tumors become resistant to cisplatin they often grow back. A new study from MIT and the University of Toronto offers a possible way to overcome that ...
Chemistry Education Office named for Robert J. Silbey
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
Oct. 22 was a special day for the Department of Chemistry. On that day, the Chemistry Education Office was named for the late dean of science and professor of chemistry at MIT, Robert J. Silbey. Not by coincidence, it was also the day the first of two A.D. Little Lectures in Physical Chemistry was d...
New implantable sensor paves way to long-term monitoring
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most important signaling molecules in living cells, carrying messages within the brain and coordinating immune system functions. In many cancerous cells, levels are perturbed, but very little is known about how NO behaves in both healthy and cancerous cells. "Nitric o...
Turning bacteria into chemical factories
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
Most academics follow a very traditional path to a job as a professor: earn a PhD, spend a few years as a postdoc, then find a tenure-track job as an assistant professor. Kristala Jones Prather decided to take a detour from that path. After earning her PhD in chemical engineering at the University o...
Self-steering particles go with the flow
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
MIT chemical engineers have designed tiny particles that can "steer" themselves along preprogrammed trajectories and align themselves to flow through the center of a microchannel, making it possible to control the particles' flow through microfluidic devices without applying any external forces. Suc...
Catalyst for business
MIT News - Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, August 25, 2014
After working at a software company for four years, MIT alumnus Andrew Dougherty MBA '01 was itching to do something entrepreneurial in the energy industry. Browsing the website of MIT's $50K (now $100K) Entrepreneurship Competition, he found an exact match for his interests: an invention by MIT pos...
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