MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering

The latest news from MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering
3 Questions: Dara Entekhabi on NASA's soil-moisture mission
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, 4 hours ago
Dara Entekhabi, an MIT professor of civil and environmental engineering and of earth, atmospheric and planetary sciences, is the science team leader of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite, scheduled to be launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Jan. 29. The satellit...
New analysis explains collagen's force
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, January 22, 2015
Research combining experimental work and detailed molecular simulations has revealed, for the first time, the complex role that water plays in collagen - a protein that is a component of tendons, bone, skin and other structural tissues in the body. The new analysis reveals an important mechanism tha...
Alumnus Larry Linden to speak on his "journey to climate activism"
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, January 20, 2015
Throughout the spring semester, the MIT Climate Change Conversation will sponsor a number of events with one unifying goal in mind: bringing the campus together to figure out how MIT can best take on climate change. On Wednesday, Jan. 21, the series of events kicks off with a talk titled, "One Man's...
3 Questions: Lydia Bourouiba on Ebola virus transmission
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, January 20, 2015
Lydia Bourouiba, the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor in MIT's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, garnered media attention last year for her research showing that aerosol particles produced by sneezing and coughing could spread much farther than ha...
How to predict responses to disease
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, January 13, 2015
Sometimes the response to the outbreak of a disease can make things worse - such as when people panic and flee, potentially spreading the disease to new areas. The ability to anticipate when such overreactions might occur could help public health officials take steps to limit the dangers. Now a new ...
MIT Forum for Supply Chain releases annual report on U.S. manufacturing
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, December 11, 2014
The MIT Forum for Supply Chain Innovation announced today that it has released survey results from its 2014 global manufacturing study led by MIT professor David Simchi-Levi and conducted with Supply Chain Digest, and will issue a full report on the results, titled, "Global Forces: The Transformatio...
Small volcanoes make a dent in global warming
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, December 02, 2014
New research shows that relatively small volcanic eruptions can increase aerosol particles in the atmosphere, temporarily mitigating the global warming caused by greenhouse gases. The impact of such smaller eruptions has been underestimated in climate models, the researchers say, and helps to accoun...
Amphibious achiever
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, November 25, 2014
Early one morning last January, MIT undergraduate Theresa Oehmke was eating breakfast at the Kilauea Military Camp on Hawaii's Big Island when a colleague burst into the room, yelling, "Oh my god, the plume, it's moving! We have to go chase it now!" Without asking questions, Oehmke threw together a ...
Simchi-Levi and colleagues win INFORMS Daniel H. Wagner Prize for Excellence in Operations Research Practice
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, November 19, 2014
MIT Professor David Simchi-Levi and eight colleagues have received the 2014 INFORMS Daniel H. Wagner Prize for Excellence in Operations Research Practice for a project that utilizes Simchi-Levi's Risk Exposure Index (REI) to identify risk and mitigate disruptions in the automotive supply chain. The ...
New way to predict how traffic will flow
MIT News - Civil & Environmental Engineering, November 06, 2014
A reliable way of predicting the flow of traffic could be a great convenience for commuters, as well as a significant energy-saver. During an emergency evacuation following a natural disaster, reliable predictions of the best routes could even be a lifesaver. Now a team of researchers from MIT, the ...
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