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An Improved CW Immune Detector Log Video Amplifier

CW-immune Detector Log Video Amplifiers have undergone little change in the past 30 years. Anadyne has spent 10+ years working on the problems and has introduced new circuitry that takes CW-immune DLVA’s performance to a different level. This webinar reviews the subject and impact of Anadyne’s new circuitry on a perceived vulnerability in the previous generation of CW-immune DLVAs.



Date: August 8, 2017
Time: 2 PM EDT (11 AM PDT)
Duration: 1 hour
Presented by:

Overview

About 30 years ago Anadyne found a vulnerability in CW-immune detector log video amplifiers. For many years, the community was unaware of, or in denial about, this matter. It is now recognized by virtually everyone.

A detector log video amplifier (DLVA) utilizes a transducer to convert the physical effect being measured to a voltage or current. The voltage or current is then passed through a log video amplifier (LVA) to produce an output logarithmically proportional to the magnitude the input of the effect.

DLVAs are designed to detect power pulses, even in the presence of other radio frequency (RF) signals, including continuous wave (CW) radio frequency signals. The ability to suppress CW RF waveforms is an important design parameter called CW immunity, and it is formally defined as the power range (generally in dBm) over which the CW signals will be rejected. For DLVA manufacturers and designers this is a difficult task. Few companies can claim to have the upper hand when manufacturing DLVAs. This is one reason CW-immune DLVAs have undergone little change in the past 30 years.

Anadyne has spent 10+ years working on the problems and has introduced new circuitry that takes CW-immune DLVA performance to a different level. This webinar reviews the subject and impact of Anadyne's new circuitry on a perceived vulnerability in the previous generation of CW-immune DLVAs.

Key Take-Aways

  • Understand the problems associated with improving performance of CW-immune Detector Log Video Amplifiers
  • Learn the tradeoffs involved in optimizing different facets of the performance
  • Discover Anadyne's capabilities
  • Learn how to interact with Anadyne to make use of this technology

Speaker

Dave Dorfan, Chairman/Technical Director, Prof. of Physics (Emeritus) UCSC, Anadyne Inc.

Dave Dorfan received his Ph. D. in physics from Columbia University. After two years as a Post Doc at SLAC, he joined the Physics Faculty at UC Santa Cruz where he spent 38 years, many as Department Chair. In the late seventies, he decided he needed to learn analog electronics as a generation of physicists who understood noise, transducers and high-speed electronics, was retiring. He took a year off to learn and spent the time in industry. The second IC he designed, the Anadyne L-17C won a Microwaves and RF Product of the Year award.

On the academic front he built a large analog lab at UCSC, and pushed, against a lot of prejudice, for incorporation of VLSI right in the heart of the giant detectors used at the colliding beam accelerators. He developed and designed the prototypes for the 6 million amplifier-comparators used by the Silicon Strip innermost detector for the Atlas collaboration at the LHC. They worked perfectly in a very high radiation environment.

He retired from UCSC in 2006 and has worked at Anadyne full time, except for a few years when he had a half time appointment as a visiting professor and Special Adviser to the Dean at the prestigious new Japanese International Graduate School, OIST.