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Engineering Reference Materials for Mouse Schematic
  • Mouse

    , and the fact that one must make it scurry along a surface. As you move the mouse, the pointer on the display screen moves in the same direction. Mice contain at least one button and sometimes as many as three, which have different functions depending on what program is running. Some mice also include

  • Implementing a Simple Serial Mouse Controller

    The mouse is becoming increasingly popular as a standard pointing data entry device. There is no doubt that the demand for the mouse is increasing. Various kinds of mice can be found in the market, including optical mice, opto-mechanical mice, and their close relative, trackballs. The mouse

  • The Original CTI Industrial Mouse TM (.pdf)

    The CTI Electronics Industrial Mouse TM is the easiest to use and most reliable. sealed pointing device available for use in Industrial, Medical and Food. Preparation applications. Replacing the commercial pointing device without. the need for additional software drivers, the CTI Electronics

  • HCN Channels Are Not Required for Mechanotransduction in Sensory Hair Cells of the Mouse Inner Ear

    examined expression of mRNA that encodes HCN1-4 in sensory epithelia of the mouse inner ear, immunolocalization of HCN subunits 1, 2 and 4, uptake of the transduction channel permeable dye, FM1-43 and electrophysiological measurement of mechanotransduction current. Dye uptake and transduction

  • Case Study: MRI Coil Improvement for Cardiac Imaging in Mice

    It is common knowledge that mice often serve as models for the study of human health conditions and experiments to improve human medical treatments. But most people probably don't consider the accuracy of the experiments themselves, focusing instead on the results to give us confidence

  • A Washable Computer Mouse?

    How "ranking " of design requirements can lead to a good idea Suppose your team is tasked with designing a new computer mouse that has a soft touch to the hand. Crucial decisions up front can help designers downstream create innovative concepts that can result in a market first. To start, marketing

  
Discussions about Mouse Schematic
  • Re: Preventative Maintenance

    When I used to do field service work on automatic gates... then other systems.. They would often be broken and filthy before I arrived.. being somewhat of a neatnik.. I began to dust, use spray cleaner and wipe down the grime from the components and enclosures ..inside and out.... The schema...

  • Re: Trackballs Versus Mice, The Pointer of Choice.

    For those who were brought up using a mouse the paradine shift to using a trackball can be difficult. I know, it took me a little while to get used to it. But now I can't live without it, either for my laptop or my desktop. I even use my own trackball at work. I swap it between my Laptop and the wo...

  • Re: Autocad Text (Table) Export to Excel

    Hi Rorschach, Do you really need Autocad for Hydraulic Schematics? Have you considered E3 from Zuken, it is an electrical, panel, harness, fluid and hydraulic schematic tool. All the options are interlinked. It is an intelligent object orientated - easy to use tool, that will eliminate the problem...

  • Re: Is there a tutorial for Eagle 4.16r2?

    Everyone complains about how Eagle's UI is 'backwards' and so counterintuitive. Eagle started out with a similar design as AutoCAD; command line. People can draw complete schematics as well as board layouts and hardly even touch the mouse. Similar to how some of the guys I work with can draw...

  • Re: Turn Signals Not Working

    Hi, Samantha, I really don't have any further suggestions, but if you go over to Autozone.com and register for an account (it's free, takes about 2 minutes) you can get access to some electrical schematics that may help. Once you have the account you can go to the orange menu bar and mouse over "Re...

  • Re: How to Draw Schematics in Microsoft Word

    Hi TVP45, If you can draw OK in Word, try out any of these sites, or just search for 'schematic drawing, or 'schematic symbols', or 'MS Word Draw function symbols' in Google and click the "images" hyper-link second from left at top of page. Got this direct from the Microsoft site so it...

  
News about Mouse Schematic
  • Now You Can Outsource PTC-Related Drawing Changes with Locomotive Schematic Update Service from ZTR

    MINNEAPOLIS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Now you can outsource PTC-related drawing changes with Locomotive Schematic Update Service from ZTR.

  • Found: The Part Of The Mouse Brain That Motivates Exercise

    Lab Mouse Wikimedia Commons A team of researchers has found a part of the brain that controls how motivated mice are to exercise, according to a new study. The researchers created genetically modified mice that lacked neurons in the dorsal medial portion of a region of the brain called the habenula. The major difference was that the mice didn''t like to run on mouse wheels, which normal mice love to do, the researchers reported in a paper they published in the Journal of Neuroscience. "They were physically capable of running, but appeared unmotivated to do it," Eric Turner, the study''s lead scientist and a brain researcher at Seattle Children''s Research Institute, said in a statement. The mice also had "minor" differences in their gait and balance, compared to normal mice. Why mess with mouse habenulas? The team was seeking a target for future antidepressant drugs. They knew that some strong science indicates that exercise can help people with depression. What if a future drug could mimic the emotional effects of exercise on the brain? Of course, there''s a lot of work scientists will have to do before they know whether it''s a good idea to target this brain area for depression. There''s the straightforward issue of checking, with replicating studies, whether this brain region really is responsible for making mice want to exercise. Then scientists will have to see if the analogous region in human brains works similarly. They''ll also want to study whether targeting this brain region improves depression. (What if it just makes you want to exercise, without resolving your depression?) Lastly, it''s always a challenge to design drugs that are safe and effective, even if you''ve got all your targets lined up. "They were physically capable of running, but appeared unmotivated to do it." The lack of running the team documented in the mice may be related to depression, or whatever its murine counterpart might be. The dorsal medial habenula-lacking mice didn''t like sugar water as much as normal mice do, which is a measure of mouse depression. However, dorsal medial habenula-lacking mice did perform the same as normal mice in the forced-swim test, which is another common, if weird, test for hopelessness and depression in mice. The scientists performed one additional set of experiments that indicate the dorsal medial habenula might be a good target for antidepressants. They hooked mice up to a setup that allowed the mice to turn up or turn down their own dorsal medial habenula. (These are different mice from the mice who lacked dorsal medial habenulas altogether, of course.) The brain-controlling mice always chose to turn their dorsal medial habenulas up, suggesting it''s rewarding to do so. Now if only you could ask the mice exactly what that felt like.

  • Erasing a genetic mutation

    Using a new gene-editing system based on bacterial proteins, MIT researchers have cured mice of a rare liver disorder caused by a single genetic mutation. The findings, described in the March 30 issue of Nature Biotechnology, offer the first evidence that this gene-editing technique, known as CRISPR, can reverse disease symptoms in living animals. CRISPR, which offers an easy way to snip out mutated DNA and replace it with the correct sequence, holds potential for treating many genetic disorders, according to the research team. "What's exciting about this approach is that we can actually correct a defective gene in a living adult animal," says Daniel Anderson, the Samuel A. Goldblith Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT, a member of the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, and the senior author of the paper. The recently developed CRISPR system relies on cellular machinery that bacteria use to defend themselves from viral infection. Researchers have copied this cellular system to create gene-editing complexes that include a DNA-cutting enzyme called Cas9 bound to a short RNA guide strand that is programmed to bind to a specific genome sequence, telling Cas9 where to make its cut. At the same time, the researchers also deliver a DNA template strand. When the cell repairs the damage produced by Cas9, it copies from the template, introducing new genetic material into the genome. Scientists envision that this kind of genome editing could one day help treat diseases such as hemophilia, Huntington's disease, and others that are caused by single mutations. Scientists have developed other gene-editing systems based on DNA-slicing enzymes, also known as nucleases, but those complexes can be expensive and difficult to assemble. "The CRISPR system is very easy to configure and customize," says Anderson, who is also a member of MIT's Institute for Medical Engineering and Science. He adds that other systems "can potentially be used in a similar way to the CRISPR system, but with those it is much harder to make a nuclease that's specific to your target of interest." Disease correction For this study, the researchers designed three guide RNA strands that target different DNA sequences near the mutation that causes type I tyrosinemia, in a gene that codes for an enzyme called FAH. Patients with this disease, which affects about 1 in 100,000 people, cannot break down the amino acid tyrosine, which accumulates and can lead to liver failure. Current treatments include a low-protein diet and a drug called NTCB, which disrupts tyrosine production. In experiments with adult mice carrying the mutated form of the FAH enzyme, the researchers delivered RNA guide strands along with the gene for Cas9 and a 199-nucleotide DNA template that includes the correct sequence of the mutated FAH gene. Using this approach, the correct gene was inserted in about one of every 250 hepatocytes - the cells that make up most of the liver. Over the next 30 days, those healthy cells began to proliferate and replace diseased liver cells, eventually accounting for about one-third of all hepatocytes. This was enough to cure the disease, allowing the mice to survive after being taken off the NCTB drug. "We can do a one-time treatment and totally reverse the condition," says Hao Yin, a postdoc at the Koch Institute and one of the lead authors of the Nature Biotechnology paper. "This work shows that CRISPR can be used successfully in adults, and also identifies several of the challenges that will need to be addressed moving forward to the development of human therapies," says Charles Gersbach, an assistant professor of biomedical engineering at Duke University who was not part of the research team. "In particular, the authors note that the efficiency of gene editing will need to improve significantly to be relevant for most diseases and other delivery methods need to be explored to extend the approach to humans. Nevertheless, this work is an exciting first step to using modern gene-editing tools to correct the devastating genetic diseases for which there are currently no options for affected patients." To deliver the CRISPR components, the researchers employed a technique known as high-pressure injection, which uses a high-powered syringe to rapidly discharge the material into a vein. This approach delivers material successfully to liver cells, but Anderson envisions that better delivery approaches are possible. His lab is now working on methods that may be safer and more efficient, including targeted nanoparticles. Wen Xue, a senior postdoc at the Koch Institute, is also a lead author of the paper. Other authors are Institute Professor Phillip Sharp; Tyler Jacks, director of the Koch Institute; postdoc Sidi Chen; senior postdoc Roman Bogorad; Eric Benedetti and Markus Grompe of the Oregon Stem Cell Center; and Victor Koteliansky of the Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology. The research was funded by the National Cancer Institute, the National Institutes of Health, and the Marie D. and Pierre Casimir-Lambert Fund.

  • Finger Style: Exploring Multi-Touch Support in Silverlight

    Touch isn''t just a form of mouse input in Silverlight: Sometimes what''s required are controls specialized and optimized for touch.Charles PetzoldMSDN Magazine March 2010

  • How a 100-Year-Old Therapy Might Save Ebola Patients

    The treatment given to two Americans sick with Ebola relies on three "humanized" mouse monoclonal antibodies grown in special tobacco plants.

  
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Product Announcements for Mouse Schematic
Daco Hand Controllers
Custom Computer Mouse and Pointing Devices

Established for over thirty years, and ISO9001 approved, Daco UK offers you the unique opportunity to obtain a high quality joystick, trackball or control grip, tailored to your military or industrial application at a realistic price, regardless of the quantity you order, or where in the world you are. Standard products with a range of options that you can be use to configure a hand controller for most applications. Daco's modular system reduces prices, still further shortens delivery times and...

Indukey North America LLC
Indu Mouse more than just a pointing device

Order Now!  InduKey's IP68/NEMA6P-rated  InduMouse,  which is ideally suited for special hygiene requirements. Silicone sealed housings allow for full submersion. Special coatings protect against cleaners and industrial chemicals. The optical InduMouse features scroll buttons for added functionality. Available in white with USB interface.  . Features: Robust full silicone mouse with laser detection. Complete cleanable and sanitizable. can beven immersed into detergents...

Powell Electronics, Inc.
Glenair Series 80 Mighty Mouse Connectors

Series 80 Mighty Mouse Connectors & Cables. The Series 80 Connector was originally developed as a smaller and lighter alternative to D38999 connectors for aerospace applications such as Attack Helicopters and Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Today, the Series 80 "Mighty Mouse" serves in thousands of safety-critical defense, medical, industrial and geo-physical applications. The Series 80 "Mighty Mouse" Connector is supplied in six standard designs: Series 800 Light Duty UN Thread. Series 801 Heavy...