Soundproofing and Acoustic Materials Information Sound proofing and acoustic materials are used to attenuate, deaden, or control sound and noise levels from machinery and other sources for environmental amelioration and regulatory compliance. Sound proofing and acoustic materials can use either noise reduction or noise absorption. Noise reduction reduces the energy of sound waves as they pass through. Noise absorption suppresses echoes, reverberation, resonance and reflection.
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Q & A on Soundproofing and Acoustic Materials

We asked our users for their input on Soundproofing and Acoustic Materials. Here are the results of 159 users familiar with Soundproofing and Acoustic Materials.

Who Took Our Poll? | Design Trends | Applications and Use | Features | Buying Advice

Who Took Our Poll?Top

Design TrendsTop

Q:
What new technologies are influencing soundproofing and acoustic material design?
27 answers
Answers:
The production of nano particles and variable density foams that can trap and recycle a greater variety of frequencies without too much mass. (but in the end mass is hard to beat if engineered well?!)
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
FFT Analysis on PC's, new material composites, laminates. Also remote monitoring capabilities etc.
~Harry W, Project Manager, Melbourne, Australia
Everyone is nipping at the edges of performance improvement, but not providing quantum changes.
~Tom B, Product Manager, Chapel Hill, NC
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Q:
From your perspective, which companies are creating the most innovative soundproofing and acoustic materials?
15 answers
Answers:
Now you've got me. I'm really an amateur in this area and though I have a ton of links and saved pages can't recall off the top of my head any of the manufactures. Acousticoat is a product that I liked, and the paste that Noxudol makes. Sorry I can't be more specific.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
Sontech- acoustimet steel and plastic another company macing dacron whole replacing glasfiber whole
~Noise and Vibration Specialist, Örebro, Sweden
I am not up-to-date with the latest but CSR and Fletcher.
~Reinhard R, Consultant, Slacks Creek, Australia
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Applications and UseTop

Q:
What are some of the applications you have used soundproofing and acoustic materials for?
48 answers
Answers:
Engine noise deadening and general auto sound control, Studio soundproofing and acoustic adjustment, re-attachment and cleaning of sound absorbing panels on the IMAX cinema unit at the Science Museum, London, England.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
Making one commercial volume into two, building inhabited wood structures, specially floors between apartments or living spaces, improving acoustics in workshops
~Eric C, Master-carpenter Teacher, Geneva, Switzerland
Fans, ducts, rooves, walls, engine bays, pipes, silos, pumps, valves, wind tunnel, spray booth, office spaces, sports halls, gymnasiums, swimming pools
~Research & Development, Christchurch, New Zealand
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Q:
Please share with us any “non-standard” applications that soundproofing and acoustic materials have been used for.
13 answers
Answers:
I've layered low temp acoustic foams into 'fiberglass' sandwiches and then made that into fireproof jackets with fire-blanket and stainless thread. The results were good. I also used nano beads to form a thick polyuratheane sound soaking skin on some hand held power tools for use outdoors in a residential area. Not bad. But then upped the effect with sound deadening jackets over the cutting disks. Helped contain the dust prior to extraction too. Not perfect, but significant reduction achieved to appease disgruntled tenants.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
An architect we built a school for paid very much attention to the acoustics not only of the classrooms (standard), but also to the teachers' relaxing room. Walls were covered with a decorative structured, porous MDF sheet. In another case, a school too, the classroom's acoustic ceiling had a double use: it formed the "lost" concrete floor support of the above floor. Standard today, but interesting, is "replacing" missing humans' clothes in large public volumes like concert halls or theaters.
~Eric C, Master-carpenter Teacher, Geneva, Switzerland
Velvet drapes to prevent concrete bouncing in live stadium application, cardboard triangle to prevent direct rebound.
~Electronic maintenance and operation in a large vevue, Montreal, Canada
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Q:
Do you know of any disastrous mistakes that occurred due to the incorrect usage of soundproofing and acoustic materials?
8 answers
Answers:
Sydney Opera House, Melbourne Concert Hall, and many other municipal acoustic spaces suffer from design jitters - too many inputs at once, unclear specifications, a mis-communication of the consequences of sticking to a rigid brief without considering other possible uses of a major building. All this adds up to Hundreds of millions of wasted dollars and years of frustratingly below par performances.
~Harry W, Project Manager, Melbourne, Australia
Heavy acoustic foam pads on the Imax at the Science Museum. They peeled off as the glue dried out, and many of the retaining studs (spot welded to the underside of the steel floor/roof deck) failed and were pulled off sill embedded in the foam. The foam didn't impress me much either, drying out and cracking in the hot dry dusty spaces behind and above lighting racks and suspended walk ways.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
Unplanned holes of different kinds, incompetent mounting personal, building on a 1:1 scale an "original" structure/mixture no one has tested before. Poor analysis of the problem's specificities (noise's specific frequency, intensity, goals to achieve).
~Eric C, Master-carpenter Teacher, Geneva, Switzerland
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FeaturesTop

Q:
What would your design or feature "wish list" be for this product?
24 answers
Answers:
Better high temp endurance. I'd like to get hold of blanket forms and sheets that can take a good cooking in an engine bay and have direct contact with the engine to stop unwanted sound at its source.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
A single panel that can attenuate sound on one side and act as an excellent sound absorber/diffuser on the other. Almost a ready to install recording studio.
~Technical Support/Services, Mumbai, India
Improve the surface range of options, the material will work it just needs more architectural finishes to allow it to be designed into more spaces.
~John M, Design Engineer, Brighton, MI
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Q:
Is there any advice you want to share with users to help them avoid common errors in selection or usage of soundproofing and acoustic materials?
11 answers
Answers:
Tie one size fits all approach, where a particular product is used because it has great testimonials or apparent specs, often gives disappointing results. There are always several ways to approach any particular problem in acoustics - and indeed in engineering generally.
~Harry W, Project Manager, Melbourne, Australia
Stop the sound at source. Isolate wherever possible. Think simple. ( harder than you might imagine) try on a small scale if possible before spending big.
~Phil W, Industrial Access: Rapelling/Abseiling/ Difficult Access, Liverpool/London, UK
Specification must be checked not only for performance but also for spatial requirements.
~Ron D, Technical Support, Doha, Qatar
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Buying AdviceTop

Q:
Do you have any advice for people relative to buying or using soundproofing and acoustic materials?
13 answers
Answers:
Create the most effective situation or solution to your problem, do not be afraid to ask for a bigger budget, it will be cut anyway, make sure you can do more than half the job with less than half the money.
~Electronic maintenance and operation in a large vevue, Montreal, Canada
Do a thorough analysis first and a test run or visit a similar facility before committing to a particular methodology.
~Harry W, Project Manager, Melbourne, Australia
Use experienced acoustic consultant to get an complete view of the design. And check for leakage first.
~Noise and Vibration Specialist, Örebro, Sweden
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