Shaft collars attach to shafts and are used as stop features or targets for devices such as tachometers. They are usually made of aluminum, steel, stainless steel, or alloyed steel and coated with zinc, chromium or black oxide. Shaft collars made from non-metallic materials such as nylon are also available. Generally, these products are used for washdown applications such as food processing.   There are several basic shaft collar designs:
  Setscrew collars are suitable...
Learn More about Shaft Collars


Q & A on Shaft Collars

We asked our users for their input on Shaft Collars. Here are the results of 96 users familiar with Shaft Collars.

Who Took Our Poll? | Design Trends | Applications and Use | Features | Buying Advice

Design TrendsTop

Q:
What new technologies are influencing shaft collar design?
11 answers
Answers:
Ability of collars to withstand aggressive conditions, both chemically & load-wise and still remain reusable.
~Technical Support/Services, Cranberry Twp, PA
Materials used have made higher strength and more cost effective collars.
~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA

Metallurgy and materials development

~Mike U, Design Engineer, Tan Y Groes, Wales

Locking fasteners for motor/gear box mounts and coupling bolts such as the phil- lok fastener.

~Hudson, OH
The two-piece clamp-nut collar is able to provide much more axial load capacity, but I would not call it new technology.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI
Dynamic Balance requirements.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH
Way in fabrication and special materials.
~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX
Shrink disc, power lock and locknuts
~Engineering, Consulting, San Nicolas de los Garza N. L., Mexico

Improved flexibility.

~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA
Quick release, non-marring
~Brett L, Process Engineer, Plum, PA
Green energy systems
~Steven S, Product publicist, Wellesley, MA

Q:
From your perspective, which companies are creating the most innovative shaft collars?
11 answers
Answers:
I have used Browning and Dayton brands successfully, as well as some totally generic products.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI

Ringfeder, Ringspann, Lovejoy, and Fener are some that are marketed in Mexico

~Engineering, Consulting, San Nicolas de los Garza N. L., Mexico
Ruland Manufacturing Co., Inc. and Stafford Manufacturing Corp.
~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX
Stafford Manufacturing Corp.
~Steven S, Product publicist, Wellesley, MA
Siemens and or Westinghouse or FMC technologies.
~Hudson, OH
I dunno, I designed my own.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH
Stafford & Ruland
~Dennis K., Sales Account Representative, Milwaukee, WI
Fenner Drives
~Brett L, Process Engineer, Plum, PA
Gripfast
~Technical Support/Services, Cranberry Twp, PA
Stafford
~Kevin S, Engineer, Morrisville, NC
Stafford
~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA

Applications and UseTop

Q:
What are some of the applications you have used shaft collars for?
33 answers
Answers:
Primary applications are for power transmission and as stops, spacers, actuators, and structural components in conveyors, packaging machinery, waste processing and many other types of equipment..
~Steven S, Product publicist, Wellesley, MA
I used shaft collars to limit axial motion of a shaft, and items sliding on the shaft. I had to use non-marring type collars.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI
Shafts for servomotor and ballscrews, mechanical couples in different machinery.
~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX

I designed a twist lock for lifting containers.  The 2"shaft had a 1/4'x1 1/4 groove to take a split collar then a retaining tube holds it .Very high load holding, very easy to take apart to work on, the collar was 1 1/2 id x 2 1/2 od x 11/4 thick, much better and cheaper than using a screw thread.

~Bill C, Design Engineer, Sydney, Australia

Retention & placement of a wide variety of components... vertical & horizontal glass washers drive shafts & pinch rollers, overhead crane drive shaft alignment, limit switch cams on both cranes & floor equipment...

~Technical Support/Services, Cranberry Twp, PA
Balance fixtures using custom split tapered locking collars that leave no marks of shaft that I designed years ago.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH
Position idler sprockets on round or square shafting, as added bearing protection as a flinger/shield.
~Dennis K., Sales Account Representative, Milwaukee, WI

Installing shafts on conveyors, mechanisms, and assembly machines.

~Kevin S, Engineer, Morrisville, NC

When I needed to hold parts as bearings, gearboxes, disc, etc.

~Engineering, Consulting, San Nicolas de los Garza N. L., Mexico
Setting air cylinder stokes, holding shafts, maintaining position.
~Brett L, Process Engineer, Plum, PA
Positioning, Anti-rotation, Holding, Key Replacement
~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA
Axles. Holding wheels on axles on light duty carts.
~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA
Setting shaft lateral position Positioning cams
~Trevor P, Engineer, Woodend, Australia
For clamping drive pulleys to drive shafts.
~Engineering, Design, Belding, MI
Shaft restraint, sensor trigger mounting
~Mitch H, Design Engineer, Picton, Australia
Bearing retainer, torque arm attachment
~Engineer, Fairfield, OH
Attachments between motors and shafts.
~Engineering, Design, Petach Tikva, Israel
Slurry Pumps, Liquid Ring Compressors
~Gabriel M, Engineering Consultant, Calgary, Canada

Auto repairing and machinery area

~Ercan C, Design Engineer, Istanbul, Turkey
Adjusting screws, limit actuators
~John M, Many of the above, Norwell, MA
Mainly motor to gear box mounts.
~Hudson, OH
Pump shaft attachment to motor.
~Other, kenosha, WI
Bearing stop, spacing, timing
~Jerry R, Technical Support, Rockford, IL
Retainers, adjusters, stops
~Mississauga, Canada
Gear boxes & transmissions
~Mike U, Design Engineer, Tan Y Groes, Wales
Retaining bearings, seals
~Engineering, Design, Hamilton, Canada
Stops and locators
~Engineering, Design, New Freedom, PA
Lock down bearings
~Technical Support/Services, beech island, SC

Pumps, motors

~Marketing/Sales, Pittsburgh, PA
Wind Turbine
~Engineering, Design, Plano, TX

Q:
Please share with us any “non-standard” applications that shaft collars have been used for.
8 answers
Answers:
Collars have been used for mounting equipment and for use as rotary encoder devices to measure rotation. Specifically, aluminum collars with metal inserts.
~Steven S, Product publicist, Wellesley, MA

Used 2 spaced pairs to support and position 2 stub shafts for conveyor roller application where through shaft would not have fit.

~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA
Setting the seat height on a shop stool.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI
Dynamic Balance fixtures.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH
Spacers, press drivers
~John M, Many of the above, Norwell, MA
Toolholders
~Jerry R, Technical Support, Rockford, IL

This collar in its own groove will take very high end loads, a standard collar won't.

~Bill C, Design Engineer, Sydney, Australia
3D motions
~Engineering, Design, Petach Tikva, Israel

Q:
Do you know of any disastrous mistakes that occurred due to the incorrect usage of a shaft collar?
5 answers
Answers:

The collar on a floating drive shaft (no thrust washer) wore into the opening until the set screw entered the opening. The shaft had to be cut in two places, drilled and the collar ground out with an air-powered rotary tool.  A new shaft (emergency delivery), custom made collar and washer (in-house) and 28 hrs. down time. Their screams still haunt me at night.

~John M, Many of the above, Norwell, MA

A setscrew collar was used as a stop on a cylinder rod. The screw damaged the rod and the cylinder had to be replaced, which was costly.  And the leak from the damaged rod was messy.

~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI

Wheel/pulley flying off at higher speeds due to an oversized shaft collar.

~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA

Do not use set screw type always use clamp style so you don't damage the mating shaft.

~Jerry R, Technical Support, Rockford, IL

It caused a long down time on machines and we spent a lot of money on repairs.

~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX

FeaturesTop

Q:
What would your design or feature "wish list" be for this product?
14 answers
Answers:

A collar that will hold a very high load and is very easy to take apart to service.  Only use an allan key - no big heavy spanners in confined spacers.

~Bill C, Design Engineer, Sydney, Australia
The ability to function correctly with a range of shaft diameters, instead of the very narrow range.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI
Zero Eccentricity. Zero axial slip. Zero witness marks on shaft.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH
Precision balancing and the ability to be integrated to perform multiple functions.
~Steven S, Product publicist, Wellesley, MA

Security for holding without damaging or breaking threaded shafts oppressors.

~Engineering, Consulting, San Nicolas de los Garza N. L., Mexico

Have none - recently discovered available pipe sizes which were not previously available.

~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA
2 piece with corrosion protection available in metric sizes.
~Mitch H, Design Engineer, Picton, Australia
Broader range of OD sizes for the most popular ID sizes.
~Dennis K., Sales Account Representative, Milwaukee, WI

Maybe spare parts for complex collars.

~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX
Cross hole for pin for a positive stop.
~Jerry R, Technical Support, Rockford, IL
Attachment without affecting balance.
~Mike U, Design Engineer, Tan Y Groes, Wales
Self aligning couplings.
~Hudson, OH
Hand tighten/loosen
~Brett L, Process Engineer, Plum, PA
More sizes
~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA

Q:
Is there any advice you want to share with users to help them avoid common errors in selection or usage of shaft collars?
8 answers
Answers:

Collars on rotating shafts must fit tightly and not have projecting set screws. Otherwise vibration problems WILL ensue. Two-piece collars with opposing screws must be rsed for high speed applications. Always use thrust washers on rotating shafts.

~John M, Many of the above, Norwell, MA

Be sure to verify that the selected collar will not upset the balance on a rotating shaft.

~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI
Good torque capability but need to check with mfg. rating and be conservative. Do not fit all situations - may need to use wedge style for improved torques.
~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA
Double check the width limitations in the application.
~Dennis K., Sales Account Representative, Milwaukee, WI

Share the application with the supplier before buying any kind of shaft collar- it helps to get the correct part.

~Martin A, Process Engineer, San Luis Potosi, TX

Take an accurate measure of the shaft to be sure its not a metric size.

~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA
Need to be heat treated stk for strength.
~Jerry R, Technical Support, Rockford, IL
You get what you design for.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH

Buying AdviceTop

Q:
Do you have any advice for people relative to buying or using shaft collars?
6 answers
Answers:
Be sure to select the correct material for the environment it will be used in. Also, plan for more axial loading than you believe there will be.
~William K, Engineer, Royal Oak,, MI

Use a collar that closely matches the shaft diameter.  Be sure the material has appropriate wear characteristics for the job at hand.

~John M, Many of the above, Norwell, MA

Take time to find the right fit for your need and don't settle for something close. With a little effort, you can find the right size and right price.

~Andre L, Marketing/Sales, Scott, LA

McMaster-Carr has good selection but not all styles and sizes.  Sometimes you need to go direct to mfg. source.

~Doug G, Design Engineer, Media, PA

Make sure the material is compatible for load and stress and thermal response with adjacent parts.

~Mike U, Design Engineer, Tan Y Groes, Wales
You get what you pay for.
~Charlie R, Senior Designer/Checker, Holland, OH


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