Description   Industrial lubricants are oils, fluids, greases, and other compounds that reduce friction, binding, wear, or exclude moisture. Their primary function is to displace solid surfaces with a fluid film. They are otherwise used to modify surface properties, regulate temperature, or remove debris. The ideal lubricant minimalizes solid-to-solid contact and reduces any amount of friction that would otherwise impede movement and induce wear.   Lubrication Regimes   The...
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Q & A on Industrial Lubricants

We asked our users for their input on Industrial Lubricants. Here are the results of 134 users familiar with Industrial Lubricants.

Who Took Our Poll? | Design Trends | Applications and Use | Features | Buying Advice |

Who Took Our Poll?Top

Design TrendsTop

Q:
What new technologies are influencing industrial lubricant design?
17 answers
Answers:
New seals and the reduction of gearbox sizes, however the power transmittal is the same. This means smaller lubricant sump volume and excessive heat degradation.
~Zaakier J, Technical Support, Cape Town, South Africa
Food Grade Applications. Faster running machinery. Higher Drive-line loading. The ongoing need to reduce friction and maximize equipment life.
~Alan A P, Managing Director - Consulting Engineer, Hindmarsh, Australia
Composites, new materials, environmental requirements - new runway de-icers etc.
~Engineering, Consulting, Toulouse, France
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Q:
From your perspective, which companies are creating the most innovative industrial lubricants?
15 answers
Answers:
Most Manufacturers have a Premium range of products within their overall range, in many instances companies will formulate specialized lubricants for very severe applications if the need is great enough. It is mostly about being able to interpret the individual manufacturer's technical data specifications in relation to a specific application to give the longest wearing life of equipment.
~Alan A P, Managing Director - Consulting Engineer, Hindmarsh, Australia
Almost all reputable Industrial Lubricant Formulators are keeping up with advancements in technology or they will soon perish.
~Charlie P., Lubrication Engineer, Warren, MI
I see many of the Majors reacting to the market needs. Independent lubricant manufacturers can be more innovative.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
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Applications and UseTop

Q:
What are some of the applications you have used industrial lubricants for?
37 answers
Answers:
We have applied Teflon coatings to all types of industrial parts where friction, corrosion, galling, and non-stick-release are problems to be solved. Coated parts include: bearings, shafts, splines, threads, pistons, gears, basically anything that moves or has wear.
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
Steel mills----sugar mills----paper mills----quarries-----refineries-----aluminium casting-- heavy duty trucks engine and wheel bearings---timber forestry----harbor cranes & wire ropes----gear drives.
~Trevor R, Engineering Consultant, Durban, South Africa
Centrifugal pumps, gearboxes, electrical motors, conveyors, vibrating screens, fans for fresh air and exhaust gases on boilers, turbines, pulp and paper machines, cement mills.
~Technical Support/Services, TALCAHUANO, Chile
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Q:
Please share with us any “non-standard” applications that industrial lubricants have been used for.
11 answers
Answers:
I had a dairy farmer ask me one time for oil that would not kill sperm. He wanted it to lube his arm as he inseminated cows.. I had a rancher ask me for for Chevron White Rose Oil. A highly refined oil. He wanted to use it to put in horse feed to help flush out the sand that horses ingested while grazing. I declined both sales. Massage parlors used to ask for a certain Texaco Mineral OIl in 1/55 drums, Texaco discouraged the sale of the product to massage parlors.
~BUD S, Marketing/Sales, WEST PALM BEACH, FL
We have coated many different types of parts over the years....firearms are one of these where dry film lubricants coatings work well as a way to lubricate the action of the weapon without the use of wet lubricants which can often entrain dirt and other debris. Race car pistons coated with teflon also improve horsepower, lower temperature, and improve performance.
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
We have used engine oils and transmission fluids for industrial air compressors on a regular basis. That is now going away as many of the industrial air compressor lubricants are more resistant to high temperatures.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
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Q:
Do you know of any disastrous mistakes that occurred due to the incorrect usage of industrial lubricants?
14 answers
Answers:
Some user bought an ester based air compressor fluid for a rotary screw compressor. After very little time the Acid Number had jumped to above 10 and the unit was making oil because the humidity in the air caused acid byproducts to be formed. Another one had a customer put extreme pressure gear oil in and engine. Lucky for him the maintenance foreman noticed that his gear lube was gone and asked what had been done for it to be gone. No damage was done but a pretty good scare for the maintenance mechanic.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
Yes.....people who apply coatings sometimes take short-cuts on preparing the part properly for coating.....resulting in disbondment, peeling, and flaking of the coating from the part.
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
Filter blockage, gelling of lubricant reducing lubrication effectiveness. Excessive pump cavitation due to incorrect viscosity grade lubricant used.
~Zaakier J, Technical Support, Cape Town, South Africa
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FeaturesTop

Q:
What would your design or feature "wish list" be for this product?
10 answers
Answers:
Temperature range -200°C + 250°C High Temp Matrix Li complex or better Low Viscosity with High Load capability Excellent Water Washout Excellent Corrosion Protection Long durability for longer re-lube periods
~Engineering, Consulting, Toulouse, France
I wish for an NLGI 2 that has excellent high temperature oxidation resistance but can still be pumped hundreds of feet in an automatic lube system.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
Longer oil life and cost effective although the two are not always mentioned in the same sentence.
~Zaakier J, Technical Support, Cape Town, South Africa
Longer bearing life and long life lubes saving energy.
~Gary E, Engineer, Bunde, Netherlands
Ability to clean, treat and lubricate. All in One.
~Chin hoe Yap, General Management, Singapore, Singapore
More available data on additive reaction.
~Trevor R, Engineering Consultant, Durban, South Africa
Infra-Red or UV cured coating systems
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
Oil which is perfect for gas engines
~Engineering Consultant, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Long life use & high performances
~Ruxa, Technical Support, Bucharest, Romania
Shear strength High flash point
~Marketing/Sales, Osborne Park, Australia

Buying AdviceTop

Q:
Do you have any advice for people relative to buying or using industrial lubricants?
15 answers
Answers:
Always use an appropriate lubricant for the application. Cheapest is not usually the best, just because most manufacturers want to make and sell Lithium / Lithium Complex Greases (high volume relatively low cost), which will often be described as "the best because they are compatible", does not mean that in any application that they will provide the longest life with the minimum wear.
~Alan A P, Managing Director - Consulting Engineer, Hindmarsh, Australia
Yes, have them consider all values of a lubricant including support and technical advice from a knowledgeable representative that is a link between the supplier and you the user. Also have the supplier be a partner in your business as he thinks of ways to make the lubricants price be a non-factor.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
Buy quality products that will protect your expensive machinery. vDo not try to save pennies and lose dollars.
~BUD S, Marketing/Sales, WEST PALM BEACH, FL
Please confirm lubricant specifications of the machinery in the machinery maintenance manual.
~Zaakier J, Technical Support, Cape Town, South Africa
To correctly analyze typ e& age of equipment, OEM recommendation, operation temperature.
~Ruxa, Technical Support, Bucharest, Romania
Do not rely on ideas of purchasers. Rely more on technical experienced people.
~Gary E, Engineer, Bunde, Netherlands
Read the product spec carefully and understand it before any lubricants
~Raj Pillai, Marine Country Manager, Rawang, Malaysia
Try to leverage your buying power by buying from a single supplier.
~Charlie P., Lubrication Engineer, Warren, MI
Lubricant should be carefully selected to serve the purpose.
~Engineering Consultant, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Cheap in cost is not always cheaper in the application
~Engineering, Consulting, Toulouse, France
Listen to the experienced lubricants engineer
~Trevor R, Engineering Consultant, Durban, South Africa
Don't go with the cheapest price
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
Dispose of all wastes properly.
~David W, Planner / Estimator, San Diego, CA
Select carefully to save money.
~Chin hoe Yap, General Management, Singapore, Singapore
Don't buy the cheapest!
~Ed B, Marketing/Sales, Buffalo, NY

Q:
Is there any advice you want to share with users to help them avoid common errors in selection or usage of industrial lubricants?
15 answers
Answers:
Deal with an independent supplier that has access to product specifications relative to your individual needs, we have experienced some situations where certain manufacturers will select products from within their own range that are deemed a near enough equivalent to that which is required, rather than to source an ideal product for an application from someone else's range. This can lead to major failures.
~Alan A P, Managing Director - Consulting Engineer, Hindmarsh, Australia
Use the grade and type of oil recommended by the manufacturer of the machinery you are buying for. They know the tolerances and additives they want in the lubricant. They have a specific reason for using certain types of oils.
~BUD S, Marketing/Sales, WEST PALM BEACH, FL
Have them consider all criteria of a lubricant need, not just a fact that all lubricants are alike. A grease is not just a grease and all are not alike in critical applications.
~Steve M, Technical Support, Fort Worth, TX
Do not mix different brands of lubricants as there could be negative additive or base oil incompatibility.
~Zaakier J, Technical Support, Cape Town, South Africa
Lower cost usually means a shortfall in one of the specification values, buyer beware.
~Engineering, Consulting, Toulouse, France
Try avoiding chemically enhanced lubricants. These lubricants harm your engines.
~Chin hoe Yap, General Management, Singapore, Singapore
To have a technical advisor and carefull study the OEM recommandations
~Ruxa, Technical Support, Bucharest, Romania
Do not believe fairy tales of salesmen . Compare technical advises
~Gary E, Engineer, Bunde, Netherlands
One should be meticulous in selection of proper grade of oil
~Engineering Consultant, Dhaka, Bangladesh
Read the Specification Sheets and the MSDS.
~David W, Planner / Estimator, San Diego, CA
Never compromise in product viscosity
~Raj Pillai, Marine Country Manager, Rawang, Malaysia
Check the OEM recommondations first.
~Charlie P., Lubrication Engineer, Warren, MI
Deal with a reputable company
~George B, President Technical Sales, Houston, TX
Know what your buying.
~Ed B, Marketing/Sales, Buffalo, NY
Do not buy on price
~Trevor R, Engineering Consultant, Durban, South Africa


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