Description   Industrial ceramic materials are non-metallic, inorganic compounds that include oxides, carbides, or nitrides. They have high melting points, low wear resistance, and a wide range of electrical properties.   How Industrial Ceramics are Made   Industrial ceramics are made of minerals that are crushed and ground into a fine powder that is then added to a solution for purification. The chemical precipitate that forms is separated from this solution and heated to...
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Q & A on Industrial Ceramic Materials

We asked our users for their input on Industrial Ceramic Materials. Here are the results of 161 users familiar with Industrial Ceramic Materials.

Who Took Our Poll? | Design Trends | Applications and Use | Features | Buying Advice

Who Took Our Poll?Top

Design TrendsTop

Q:
What new technologies are influencing industrial ceramic material design?
26 answers
Answers:
Continuous improvement of purity of raw materials, Development of materials not using heavy metals. Robotics-probably. Learning from nano-science and applying information where ever possible to the larger passive components.
~Dennis G, (former) V.P. Engineering, Cairo, NY
Net shape processing, sol gel, freeze casting low shrinkage and minimal labour input processes.
~Marketing/Sales, Frodsham, Great Britain
Sintering, optimisation of properties, new ceramic materials and their processing.
~Satyanarayana A, Manufacturer, Mumbai, India
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Q:
From your perspective, which companies are creating the most innovative industrial ceramic materials?
16 answers
Answers:
Good question, most companies are specialized in a particular area, other, large ones cover many and have even their own research. I would point to ZIRCAR (USA) for the former, St. Gobain - CREE for the latter. but what do I know?
~Klaus R, Engineering Consultant, Saint Genis-Pouilly, France
I'm not so familiar with other ceramic manufacturing companies, I'm only familiar with Ceramtec.
~Production Engineer, Lipa, Philippines
CoorsTek, Small Precision Tools, Morgan Advanced Ceramics, Ceradyne
~Bob W, General Management, Petaluma, CA
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Applications and UseTop

Q:
What are some of the applications you have used industrial ceramic materials for?
42 answers
Answers:
Insulating alumino silicate fibres and magnesia, calcium silicate fibres (superwools) in product and process development of paper, boards and vacuum formed products for various applications, including binder systems and mechanical thermal properties in insulating boards for combustion chambers. Also process development of freeze and sol gel casting technology for silica, alumina and mullite products for high tolerance complex forms such as kiln furniture and ceramic press tools for aerospace and automotive technologies. Some work in freeze ceramic deposition of silica based materials and composite ceramics and cermets.
~Marketing/Sales, Frodsham, Great Britain
In all fairness, I am in a research lab so "Industrial" might not apply. As a rule, I use ceramics as containers, heat shields and standoffs in the preparation of research materials. Typical materials are as simple as solders casts and as complicated as crystal growths of things like uranium-tin alloy intermetallic single crystals.
~Jim G, Facilities Manager, Hamilton, ON, Canada
All facets of production of multilayer ceramic chip capacitors. Additionally, raw material / new vendor evaluation, composition development, participation in team developments of productivity improvement, and yield analysis.
~Dennis G, (former) V.P. Engineering, Cairo, NY
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Q:
Please share with us any “non-standard” applications that industrial ceramic material has been used for.
14 answers
Answers:
I'm not so sure of the "standard" application of ceramic industry. In our company we used that to control the thermal and electrical conductivity. Some applications include housing of fuses (alternative to glass tubes) and as a base material for thin fuses (alternative to FR4).
~Production Engineer, Lipa, Philippines
Engine coating; or any coating at membrane; wearable cavity; artificial joints; artificial tooth; crystalize application
~Chih-Chuan Ho, Engineer, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C
Aerospace, diesel, gas engine components, laser tubes, vehicle and body armor, semiconductor process equipment.
~Bob W, General Management, Petaluma, CA
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Q:
Do you know of any disastrous mistakes that occurred due to the incorrect usage of industrial ceramic materials?
14 answers
Answers:
There are many examples, but in general, integrating certain types of ceramic into a total system where its properties are inappropriate for that application in some way, even if only one property is the weakest link. The biggest example I can think of in my past work is the wrong type of SiC for a water pump seal application which resulted in millions of warranty related cost for this company.
~John C, R&D Manager, Phoenix, AZ
Several, ranging from failed corrosion-resistant linings made from industrial ceramic materials to melt down of ceramic materials in highly radioactive environment to destruction of large induction coil furnace to a large kiln failure at a ceramics parts manufacturer.
~Gary H, Research & Development, Pittsburgh, PA
Yup. I know of a ceramic fuel cell company that suffered serious damage as a result of inappropriate ion exchange in one of their test cells.
~Ryan F, Research & Development, Brevard, NC
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FeaturesTop

Q:
What would your design or feature "wish list" be for this product?
21 answers
Answers:
Improved machinability Improved Dimensional tolerances Thermal expansion matching Improved fracture toughness
~Michael Watson, Design Engineer, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Temperature resistance in excess of 3500F, chemically inert or resistant, low modulus, high strength, energy efficient, ultra-high electrical resistance.
~Gary H, Research & Development, Pittsburgh, PA
A cubical ceramic wherein the inside part is hollow. There could be an opening on one or two of it's side/s.
~Production Engineer, Lipa, Philippines
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Q:
Is there any advice you want to share with users to help them avoid common errors in selection or usage of industrial ceramic materials?
13 answers
Answers:
There are many derivations of ceramic materials with highly varying properties and applications. One successful concept that has worked well in the past is to focus on integrating ceramics with metals, plastics or other composite materials such that the ceramic is placed strategically to give the benefit required while the secondary material provides the characteristics the ceramic doesn't have.
~John C, R&D Manager, Phoenix, AZ
Applications in which ceramic is exposed to high tensile stresses should be avoided. Also minimise / eliminate stress concentrations in designs. Be aware of potential thermal shock issues due to poor thermal conductivity and high cooling / heating rates
~Michael Watson, Design Engineer, Cambridge, United Kingdom
Material compatibility is crucial. Some compositions can cause unfavorable reactions and failures. Physical characteristics, as critical as they may be, are not the only design criteria that must be considered.
~Gary H, Research & Development, Pittsburgh, PA
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Buying AdviceTop

Q:
Do you have any advice for people relative to buying or using industrial ceramic materials?
15 answers
Answers:
If you're just considering cost, go with the long-standing companies that have been successful at commoditizing ceramic materials. If you're looking for something innovative and futuristic, study the successful small companies and ventures who are developing the cutting edge technologies.
~John C, R&D Manager, Phoenix, AZ
Make sure you know what you want. Seemingly similar materials from different suppliers can be totally different in chemo-physical properties which are not necessarily mentioned on a data sheet, but can be relevant in your project.
~Klaus R, Engineering Consultant, Saint Genis-Pouilly, France
Always check test conditions for material performance data - e.g. temperature range and ramp rate for thermal properties, load conditions and sample sizes for mechanical properties.
~Michael Watson, Design Engineer, Cambridge, United Kingdom
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