Thermal management design and analysis services perform tests and redesigns around thermal analysis, heat analysis, heat management, and heat dissipation issues. Thermal analysis refers to a group of techniques in which a physical property of a substance is measured as a function of temperature, at the same time that the substance is subjected to a controlled series of temperature changes. Most thermal management design and analysis services use several basic methods: differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential thermal analysis. In differential thermal analysis, the temperature difference that develops between a sample and an inert reference material is measured, when both are subjected to identical heat treatments.

 

Thermal management design and analysis services measure the thermal decomposition of solids and liquids, chemical reactions between solids and between solids and gases, phase transitions, materials specifications, and inorganic solid material adsorption. Thermal management design and analysis services can also characterize polymers, organic or inorganic chemicals, metals, semiconductors and other common classes of materials. One of the most common techniques of thermal analysis is differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC measures the temperatures and heat flow associated with transitions in materials as a function of time and temperature. DSC also determines transition temperatures, melting and crystallization, and heat capacity.

 

Thermal management design and analysis services may perform thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). TGA is based on the measurement of the weight loss of the material as a function of temperature. DTA involves heating or cooling a test sample and an inert reference under identical conditions, while recording any temperature difference between the sample and reference. This differential temperature is then plotted against time, or against temperature. Changes in the sample in which heat is stored or released can be detected relative to the inert reference. In two inert samples, differential temperatures can arise when their responses to the applied heat treatment are not identical.

 

Thermal management design and analysis services use DTA to study thermal properties and phase changes which do not produce a change in enthalpy. The baseline of the DTA curve should then exhibit discontinuities at the transition temperatures and the slope of the curve at any point will depend on the microstructural constitution at that temperature.