Darlington Transistors Information

Darlington transistors are circuits that combine two bipolar transistors in a single device. They provide high current gain and require less space than configurations that use two discrete transistors.

 

In Darlington pairs, transistor collectors are tied together and the emitter of the first transistor is directly coupled to the base of the second transistor.

 

The total gain, which is often 1000 or more, is the product of the gain of the individual transistors.

 

Compared to single transistor configurations, Darlington transistor pairs have more phase shift at high frequencies and can become unstable with negative feedback more easily.

 

Darlington transistors also have a higher base-emitter voltage, which is the sum of both base emitter voltages. Sidney Darlington, an engineer at Bell Laboratories in the 1950s, is credited with first combing two transistors on a single chip.

 

Performance Specifications

 

Darlington Transistors InformationSelecting Darlington transistors requires an analysis of performance specifications. The common emitter current gain, the ratio of collector current to base current (Darlington Transistors Information ), characterizes the amplifying ability of bipolar transistors.

 

Collector-to-emitter breakdown voltage (Darlington Transistors Information ) is the maximum voltage than can be applied continuously in the reverse direction of the collector junction when the emitter is open. Other important considerations include collector-to-base breakdown voltage (Darlington Transistors Information ) and maximum collector current (Darlington Transistors Information).

Current gain bandwidth product (Darlington Transistors Information) is the frequency at which the common emitter current gain is in unity. Power dissipation (Darlington Transistors Information), which is usually expressed in watts or milliwatts, is the total power consumption of the device.

 

Operating temperature (Darlington Transistors Information) is the junction’s full-required range of ambient operating temperatures. Some Darlington transistors support a specific temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for commercial or industrial applications. Other devices meet screening levels for military specifications (MIL-SPEC).

 

Features

 

Darlington Transistors Information

Darlington transistors vary in terms of polarity, packaging, and packing methods.

 

NPN is a physical bipolar junction transistor (BJT) arrangement in which the emitter and the collector are made of N-type material and the base is made of P-type material.

 

By contrast, PNP is a BJT arrangement in which the emitter and the collector are made of P-type material and the base is made of N-type material.

 

In terms of packaging, Darlington transistors are available in small outline (SO), transistor outline (TO), small outline transistor (SOT), discrete packaging (DPAK), and flatpack.

 

Darlington transistors often use either surface mount technology (SMT) or through hole technology (SMT) and vary in terms of the number of leads. Packaging methods for Darlington transistors include tape reels, rails, bulk packs, tubes, and trays.

 

Standards

 

BS EN 120003 - Specification for harmonized system of quality assessment for electronic components - blank detail specification - phototransistors, photodarlington transistors, phototransistor arrarrays.

MIL-M-38510/141 - Microcircuits, linear, darlington transistor array, seven and eight gate, monolithic silicon.

MIL-PRF-19500/738 - Semiconductor device, transistor, NPN, silicon, power darlington, types 2n7575, 2n7576, and 2n7577, jan, jantx, jantxv, and jans.

SMD 5962-86058 - Microcircuit, linear, high-voltage, high current, darlington transistor arrays, monolithic silicon. 

 

References

 

Image Credits:

 

1-Source Electronic Components | Skyworks Solutions, Inc. | Up Teks Co., Ltd.

 


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