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Burner Type:

Combustion Fuel:

Maximum Capacity:

Application Temperature:

Firing:

Convection:

Fuel-Oil Atomizer Type:

Recuperation?

Regenerative?

Thermoelectric Safety?

Electronic Quick-Lockout?

Low NOx?

Help with Burners specifications:

Configuration
   Burner Type       
   Your choices are...         
   Atmospheric Venturi       Atmospheric venturi burners are gas-only devices. The velocity of the gas stream flowing through the orifice entrains atmospheric air for combustion. The resulting mixture burns at a specially-designed tip called a flame-retention head. With hot glass (glory-hole), tank and pot furnaces, atmospheric burners generally use high-pressure, liquefied petroleum (LP) gas since the pressure of reticulated natural gas is usually too low to aspirate sufficient air and generate a hot, short flame with adequate forward velocity. Atmospheric natural gas burners are often used with ceramic kilns. 
   Nozzle Mixing       Nozzle mixing burners do not mix the gas and air until after they leave the burner port. Up to the burner head, the air and gas are kept separate. Unless high velocity is required, lower gas and air pressures may be used since flashback is unlikely. Nozzle mixing burners have greater turndown than other burners because they only control the gas and can use preheated air. Since the preheated combustion air is kept separate, there is no chance of over-heating the gas controls. There are three main types of nozzle mixing burners: medium velocity, excess air burners; multiple-tunnel, high-heat release burners; and high-momentum burners. 
   Premix       Premix burners use a machined mixing-set and forced air from a blower or compressor. There are two basic types: open and sealed. Open premix burners use a steel or cast iron retention-tip. Sealed premix burners use a return intake (RI) castable tunnel or a multi-port (MP) tip mounted into the furnace wall. Natural gas or liquefied petroleum (LP) gas may be used at low pressure since the forced air induces the gas and produces a blast-type flame. Premix burners are more efficient than atmospheric burners. They provide greater control over the air and gas mix, and produce hotter air. Sealed premix burners do not require wasteful secondary air. Open premix burners need secondary air for cooling purposes, and to prolong the tip’s life and complete combustion. Some operators trade tip-life for lower noise and lower capacity by using fiber to seal the tip in the furnace port. 
   Radiant / Infrared       Radiant or infrared (IR) burners provide heat from a hot, glowing surface that radiates IR energy. 
   Ribbon       Ribbon burners are elongated burners that are used to curve and shape glass-tubing. 
   Surface Mix       Surface-mix burners do not allow the gases to mix internally. Instead, the gases are channeled to the tip separately and mixed at the time of ignition. Surface-mix burners produce a safer, quieter, and more efficient flame than pre-mix burners. 
   Vortex       Vortex burners can completely incinerate not only fuel gas or oil, but also waste gas or waste oil without leaving any unburnt carbon. The combustion flame is extremely short and very stable, with vortex motion and high-heat release that generates hot gas at 1500° F - 1800 °F. 
   Other       Other unlisted or proprietary burner types. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Combustion Fuel       
   Your choices are...         
   Alternative Fuel       Alternative fuels include bio diesel, bio-fuels, and landfill gas. 
   Butane       Butane is a paraffin hydrocarbon and constituent of liquefied petroleum (LP) gas. Butane is a gas in atmospheric conditions, but easily liquefied under pressure. 
   Coal       Coal is a readily-combustible black or brownish-black rock whose composition, including inherent moisture, consists of more than 50% by weight and more than 70% by volume of carbonaceous material. Coal is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically-altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time. 
   Natural Gas       Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons and varying quantities of nonhydrocarbons that exist either in the gaseous phase or in solution with crude oil in natural, underground reservoirs. 
   Light Oil       Light fuel oils are distilled during the refining process. Most of the petroleum used in internal combustion and gas turbine engines is light oil. 
   Heavy Oil       Heavy oil remains after lighter oils have been distilled during the refining process. Except for start-up and flame stabilization, most of the petroleum used in steam plants is heavy oil. 
   Propane       Propane, sometimes indicated as liquefied petroleum (LP), is a catchall term for pure propane, pure butane, and mixtures of the two. Propane also includes propylene and butylene, which are sometimes included in blends, mostly outside the United States and Canada. In North America, propane is the most likely to be available in industrial quantities. Nearly any natural gas burner will operate on propane with little or no sacrifice in performance. 
   Waste Fuel       The burner uses waste fuel as its fuel source. 
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Specifications
   Maximum Capacity       The maximum British thermal units (BTU) per hour that the burner can release while burning with a stable flame and satisfactory combustion. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Application Temperature       The burner's application temperature. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Firing       
   Your choices are...         
   Direct       The heat generated in the burner's combustion chamber is transferred directly. 
   Indirect       The heat from a medium such as air, steam or water is transferred to another heating medium contained separately in the burner. 
   Search Logic:      Products with the selected attribute will be returned as matches. Leaving or selecting "No Preference" will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Convection       
   Your choices are...         
   Forced Draft       Forced-draft products use a fan to supply combustion air to the burners of a heater and to overcome the pressure drop of the burners and any air-preheat equipment. 
   Natural Draft       Natural-draft products require a draft to move combustion air into the heater and flue gas through the heater and out the stack. 
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Features
   Fuel-Oil Atomizer Type       
   Your choices are...         
   External Mix Steam       External-mix steam atomizers are sometimes called steam-assisted, pressure-jet atomizers. They are designed to use pressure-jet atomization at high outputs and blast atomization at low outputs. The atomizer consists of a conventional, simplex pressure-jet tip surrounded by the steam-supply passage. Steam issues through an annular gap after achieving the correct degree of swirl to ensure that the steam exit-angle matches the oil-spray cone angle. The steam-supply pressure remains constant throughout the complete turndown range of the burner. Because no mixing of fuel oil and steam occurs within the burner-gun, the oil output is unaffected by slight variations in steam pressure. 
   Internal Mix Steam       Internal-mix steam atomizers have a burner lance that consists of two centric tubes, a one-piece nozzle, and a sealing nut. Steam is supplied through the center tube and fuel oil through the outer tube. The steam space is completely isolated from the oil space and the atomizer's body arranges discharge nozzles in a pitch circle so that each oil-bore meets a corresponding steam-bore in a point of intersection. Oil and steam (air) mix internally, forming a high-pressure emulsion. Finely-atomized oil is produced as the mixture expands and then issues from the final orifice. Oil burners with steam atomizing are tolerant to viscosity changes, have better turndown, do not require high fuel-oil pump pressures, and are frugal in their use of steam. 
   Low Pressure Air       Low-pressure air atomizers are similar to rotary-cup atomizers, but use the primary airflow to force the fuel to rotate. They are suitable for firing into chambers of hot brickwork, avoiding the hazards that back-radiation poses to oil burners of less sturdy construction. The term "low-pressure" implies air up to 1000 mm WG (40 ins. WG). 
   Pressure Jet       Pressure-jet atomizers use supply-pressure energy to atomize fuel into a spray of finely-dispersed droplets. If adequate fuel pressure is supplied, extremely good combustion results can be achieved. With pressure-jet atomizers, the fuel oil is fed into the swirl chamber via tangential ports in the main atomizer body. The vortex formed in the swirl chamber creates an air core, which causes the fuel to leave the final orifice as a thin, annular film. This film has both angular and axial velocity, causing the fuel to develop into a hollow cone during discharge. 
   Rotary Cup       Rotary-cup atomizers are driven at high speeds (about 500 rpm) by an electric motor and heavy-duty belt drive. Fuel oil flows at low pressure into a conical spinning cup, where the fuel is distributed uniformly on the inner surface and thrown off the cup rim as a very fine oil-film. A fan discharges the primary air concentrically around the cup, strikes the oil film at high velocity, and atomizes it into tiny droplets. Rotary-cup atomizers are often used with packaged shell-type burners. These burners have good turndown ratio and are relatively insensitive to pollutants in the fuel oil. 
   Other       Other unlisted or proprietary atomizer types. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Recuperation       Recuperation is the process of preheating the combustion air by using the waste flue products. Although recuperation has been used in industry in various forms for many years, its use in small production situations has only recently become viable due to high fuel costs. Fuel savings of up to 40% can be achieved through properly designed and implemented systems. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Regenerative       Regenerative burners are combustion systems that can achieve extremely high efficiencies by recovering exhaust heat from industrial furnaces. They are designed for use in relatively high-temperature furnaces such as reheating furnaces, forging furnaces, heat treatment furnaces, fusing furnaces, calcination furnaces, and deodorizing equipment. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Thermoelectric Safety       Thermoelectric burners provide the simplest form of flame safety for atmospheric burners with a capacity of 500 MJ/hour. They operate on an electromagnetic principle and require no power. A small current is generated when a flame heats the tip of a thermocouple probe. This current excites an electro-magnet in a safety valve and attracts a plate, allowing gas to flow. Shut off time, should the probe cool, can be up to 20 seconds. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Electronic Quick-Lockout?       Burners with an electronic quick-lockout require power and are usually fitted to forced-air burners or safer atmospheric burners. They shut-down on flame failure in approximately 1 s by closing a solenoid valve fitted into the gas line. There are two main types of products: flame rectification and ultraviolet (UV). Flame rectification relies upon the ability of ionized gases in the flame to rectify on alternating current (AC) from the control unit. A flame-sensing rod made from special, high-temperature material is situated near the edge of the main flame. A micro-amp meter can be used in series with the rod to check the best position and minimize nuisance shutdowns. The wire must be sturdy enough to resist drooping or deterioration at high temperatures. The porcelain insulators must be kept clean or replaced if cracks develop. For reliable operation, the earthing-point on the burner must have at least four times the area of the rod in the flame. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Low NOx       Burners generate low amounts of NOx, a category of gases which includes two oxides of nitrogen related to combustion: nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Both gases are considered to be toxic and play a major role in the formation of acid rain, smog and ozone. NOx increases with flame temperature and related variables such as air-preheat and surface temperature. The flame’s chemical environment, primarily the oxygen concentration within the flame, is another important factor in NOx generation. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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