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Bus / Interface Type:

SCSI Standards:

Operating System:

Computer Platform:

Data Transfer Rate:

Data Transfer Mode?:

Help with SCSI Adapters and SCSI Controllers specifications:

Bus / Interface Type
   Bus / Interface Type       
   Your choices are...         
   ISA / EISA       Industry standard architecture (ISA) buses can handle 16-bit data transfers at a clock speed of 8 MHz. They are also capable of handling memory under 16 MB. Extended ISA (EISA) is an enhanced version of the ISA bus. EISA buses run at 8 MHz, are capable of 32-bit data transfers, and can access all memory in the system. 
   MCA       The MCA bus, which was designed to replace the ISA bus, uses IBM's microchannel architecture (MCA). It is capable of plug-and-play because adding a card to a microchannel computer does not change the interrupt and DMA settings on the card. The MCA bus was used almost exclusively with IBM's PS/2 product line, but is now discontinued. 
   PCI       Peripheral component interconnect (PCI) is a local bus system designed for high-end computer systems. PCI buses transfer 32 or 64 bits of data at a clock speed of 33 MHz. They also support 3 to 5 critical peripherals, which are either integrated directly onto the motherboard or added via expansion cards. PCI buses fully support cards that were developed for standard I/O buses. 
   PC/104 (PC/104-Plus, EBX, ETX)       PC/104 derives its name from the acronym for personal computers (PC) and the number of pins used to connect cards (104). PC/104 cards are much smaller than ISA bus cards and stack together, eliminating the need for a motherboard, backplane, and/or card cage. PC/104-Plus combines the PCI bus with the PCI/104 form factor for faster data transfers. Embedded board expandable (EBX) is a small (5.75” x 8”) form factor for single-board computers that supports PC/104 expansion.   
   Parallel Interface       A channel capable of transferring more than one bit simultaneously. 
   PCMCIA Type I       PCMCIA, Type I devices are 3.3 mm thick. They are used, primarily, as memory cards. 
   PCMCIA Type II       PCMCIA, Type II devices are 5.0 mm thick. They are used in I/O devices and as high-capacity storage drives and memory cards. 
   PCMCIA Type III       PCMCIA, Type III cards are 10.5 mm thick. They are used in I/O devices and as high-capacity storage drives and memory cards. 
   PCMCIA (PC Card) / CardBus       PCMCIA devices or PC cards are credit card-sized peripherals used mainly in laptop and notebook computers. They plug into a 68-pin host socket that is connected either to the motherboard or an expansion bus. An adapter takes the place of a COM port and translates the PCMCIA signals into a format that is usable by the computer’s bus. PC cards adhere to standards developed by the Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA). Originally, these standards were designed for adding memory to portable computers; however, standards now apply to many types of devices. There are three types of PC cards: Type I, Type II, and Type III. All types have the same width (54 mm) and length (85.6 mm), but vary in thickness. Cardbus, a 32-bit high performance bus architecture for PC cards, adds high bandwidth capabilities to PCMCIA devices. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary configuration. 
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SCSI Standards
   SCSI Standards      See tables at the end of this help file for definitions of several features of SCSI standards.
   Your choices are...         
   SCSI-1       SCSI-1, the original SCSI, was standardized by ANSI in 1986.  It allows asynchronous data transfer rates of 1.5 MB/sec and synchronous transfer rates to a maximum of 5 MB/sec. It has an 8-bit SCSI port that uses Single-ended open-collector drivers. Uses a 50-pin connector. SCSI-1 is an obsolete standard after the development of SCSI-2. 
   Wide SCSI       This term is generally applied to Wide (16-bit) SCSI with a fast data transfer rate of up to 10 MBps. 
   Fast SCSI       Standard defined in SCSI-2.  Increases the maximum data rate from 5 MBps for Narrow (8-bit) SCSI to 10 MBps. 
   Wide Fast SCSI       This term is generally applied to Wide (16-bit) SCSI with a fast data transfer rate of up to 20 MBps. 
   Ultra SCSI       This is also known as Fast-20. It doubles the FAST SCSI data rate to up to 20 MBps for the 8-bit bus 
   Wide Ultra SCSI       Wide Ultra SCSI defines a maximum transfer data rate up to 40 MBps for the Wide (16-bit) SCSI. 
   SCSI-2       SCSI-2 has significant improvements over SCSI-1 including faster data transfer rates, better connectors, wider bus path, better reliability via synchronous negotiation and parity checking. SCSI-2 has a data transfer rate from 5 MB/sec to 10 MB/sec. This speed change is called Fast SCSI-2. Also, SCSI-2 provides the option to double the bus from 8 bits to 16 bits. This change is known as Wide SCSI. By combining the Fast SCSI-2 with the Wide SCSI bus a maximum data rate of 20 MB/sec can be achieved. 
   Ultra2 SCSI       This is also known as Fast-40.  It doubles the Ultra SCSI data rate to up to 40 MBps for the 8-bit bus. 
   Wide Ultra2 SCSI       Wide Ultra2 SCSI defines a maximum data rate of 80 MBps for the Wide (16-bit) SCSI.   
   SCSI-3       The SCSI-3 specification allows for faster transfer rate, more devices on a single chain (a maximum of 32), and also it incorporates serial connections in addition to the traditional parallel interconnect of SCSI-2. The serial interconnect of SCSI-3 incorporates three technologies: Serial Storage Architecture (SSA), Fibre Channel, and IEEE P1394. The serial transfer mode allows faster data rates, more devices per bus, simple connectors, and longer cables. 
   Ultra3 SCSI (Ultra160)       This is also known as Fast-80 or Ultra-160. It doubles the Ultra2 SCSI data rate to up to 160 MBps for the 16-bit bus. 
   Ultra320 SCSI       Defines a maximum data rate of 320 MBps for the Wide (16-bit) SCSI. 
   Ultra640 SCSI       Defines a maximum data rate of 640 MBps for the Wide (16-bit) SCSI. 
   Fibre Channel       A high-speed serial protocol for channels and networks that uses links of twisted-pair, coaxial cable or fiber optic cable. SCSI can use the Fibre Channel Arbitrary Loop (FC-AL) topology. 
   Serial SCSI (FireWire®)       A very fast bus standard that supports data transfer rates of up to 400 Mbps. FireWire is a registered trademark of Apple Computers, Inc.  The standards are defined in IEEE 1394. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary SCSI standards. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Tables:         
   Bus Width      

Bus Width

Width      

Definition

Narrow

Narrow SCSI is the conventional SCSI specified in the original SCSI. The bus width is 8 bits.

Wide

Uses a data bus that is 16 bits wide. This doubling of the bus width respect to the Narrow SCSI comes at a higher cost, and it requires additional cabling and connectors.

         

 
   SCSI Type      

SCSI Type

Type      

Definition

SCSI-1

SCSI-1, the original SCSI, was standardized by ANSI in 1986. Allows asynchronous data transfer rates of 1.5 MB/sec and synchronous transfer rates to a maximum of 5 MB/sec. It has an 8-bit SCSI port that uses Single-ended open-collector drivers. Uses a 50-pin connector. SCSI-1 is an obsolete standard after the development of SCSI-2.

SCSI-2

SCSI-2 has significant improvements over SCSI-1 including faster data transfer rates, better connectors, wider bus path, better reliability via synchronous negotiation and parity checking. SCSI-2 has a data transfer rate from 5 MB/sec to 10 Mb/sec. This speed change is called Fast SCSI-2. Also, SCSI-2 provides the option to double the bus from 8 bits to 16 bits. This change is known as Wide SCSI. By combining the Fast SCSI-2 with the Wide SCSI bus a maximum data rate of 20 MB/sec can be achieved.

SCSI-3

The SCSI-3 specification allows for faster transfer rate, more devices on a single chain (a maximum of 32), and also it incorporates serial connections in addition to the traditional parallel interconnect of SCSI-2. The serial interconnect of SCSI-3 incorporates three technologies: Serial Storage Architecture (SSA), Fibre Channel, and IEEE P1394. The serial transfer mode allows faster data rates, more devices per bus, simple connectors, and longer cables.

          

 
   Bus Speed      

Bus Speed

Speed         

Definition

Regular

This is the default speed of the original specifications of SCSI-1. The regular bus speed is 5 MHz.

Fast

Fast SCSI increases the bus speed to 10 MHz. This doubling of the bus speed was defined in SCSI-2.

Ultra

Also known as Fast-20, it is specified in SCSI-3. The bus speed of Ultra SCSI is 20 MHz. Ultra SCSI buses have a maximum transfer rate of 20 MB/sec for Narrow SCSI, and 40 MB/sec for Wide SCSI.

    

 
   SCSI Standards     

SCSI Standards

 

 

 

Maximum Bus Lengths (meters)

Max Devices Supported

Protocol    

Max Speed (MBps)

Bus Width  (bits)

Single-ended

LVD  

HVD  

 

SCCI-1

5

8

6

--

--

8

Fast SCSI

10

8

3

--

25

8

Fast Wide SCSI

20

16

3

--

25

16

Ultra SCSI

20

8

1.5

--

25

8

Wide Ultra SCSI

40

16

3

--

--

8

Ultra2 SCSI

40

8

--

12

25

8

Wide Ultra2 SCSI

80

16

--

12

25

16

Ultra3 SCSI (Ultra 160)

160

16

--

12

--

16

Ultra 320

320

16

--

12

--

16

       

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Computer Platform - Operating System
   Operating System:       
   Your choices are...         
   Windows® 95 / 98       Microsoft® Windows® 95 / 98 operating system uses a graphical user interface to control the system. 
   MS-DOS       MicroSoft Disk Operating System (MS-DOS®) is a command line operating system developed by the Microsoft Corporation. 
   Windows NT®       Operating system developed by the Microsoft Corporation. It uses a graphical user interface to control the system. 
   Windows® 2000       Operating system developed by Microsoft® Corporation. It uses a graphical user interface to control the system. 
   Mac® OS       Macintosh operating system developed by Apple Computer, Inc. 
   NetWare®       A local area network (LAN) operating system developed by Novell Inc. NetWare runs on a variety of different types of LANs such as Ethernets, Token rings, etc. 
   OS/2       An operating system developed by the Microsoft Corporation and the IBM Corporation, but sold and managed solely by IBM. 
   Linux       An open-source UNIX clone operating system that runs on machines powered by the x86 microprocessor. 
   SUN Solaris       A Unix-based operating system environment developed by Sun Microsystems. Solaris runs on many workstations from vendors other than Sun Microsystems 
   SCO UNIX (x86)       A Unix-like operating system that runs on x86 machines. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary configuration. 
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Computer Platform
   Computer Platform:      Type of computer system or operating system.
   Your choices are...         
   PC       The 8086 type of machines running the DOS or Windows® operating system.  Windows is a registered trademark of the Microsoft Corporation. 
   Mac       Macintosh systems. 
   Alpha       Machines that use with the Alpha processor developed by Digital Equipment Corporation.  Alpha is a powerful RISC processor used in servers and workstations.  This is one of the few processors, other than the x86 microprocessors, that runs Windows® NT. 
   SPARC®       Scalable Processor Architecture (SPARC®) is a RISC technology developed by Sun Microsystems. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary configuration. 
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Other Specifications
   Data Transfer Rate:       The maximum data transfer rate (MB/sec) of the SCSI device. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   Data Transfer Mode?      The method of transferring data from the SCSI Adapter to the system.  There are three modes of transferring data: PIO Programmed I/O (PIO), Bus Master DMA, and Interrupt Transfer. 
   Your choices are...         
   Bus Master DMA       A method of transferring data in which the host adapter's processor transfers the data directly to the computer memory without the intervention of the CPU.  DMA transfer uses the DMA controller instead of the CPU to move the data. This is also called bus mastering or first party DMA. 
   PIO       For programmed Input / Output transfers, the CPU sends the data when it receives a software code. 
   Interrupt       Interrupt data transfer occurs when the PC receives an interrupt telling the CPU to move the data. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary configuration. 
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