See All Suppliers In This Area
Fill out as many options as you want. Click "Run Search Filter" at any time.

Equipment Type:

Arc / Resistance Processes:

Cutting / Gouging?

Surfacing / Hard Facing?

Duty Cycle:

%

Output Power Capability:

Output Current Range:

Output Voltage Range:

Engine Driven Generator?

Marine Duty / Corrosion Resistant?

Multi-operator?

Water Cooled?

Help with Arc and Resistance Welders specifications:

Equipment Type
   Equipment Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Complete System       Complete welding systems include brazing, cutting, soldering, and/or surfacing subsystems. They also include a power source or station; a torch, iron or gun; cables, feeders, and positioners; robots; and other required components. 
   Power Source / Station       Power sources or power stations are power supplies used for soldering irons, tungsten inert gas (TIG) guns, metal inert gas (MIG) guns, electrode holders, laser, electron beam guns, or other joining units. The required output power is enough to melt the material. Welding power supplies are sometimes called welding power sources. Soldering power supplies are called soldering stations. 
   Gun / Iron / Torch       Irons, torches, or guns provide a point-source of heat for melting solder or filler alloys at a joint or interface. Typically, soldering irons are heated using electrical resistance. Gas torch or hot air-heated irons are also available and are useful in plumbing or field applications where an electrical power source is not available. Gas burning, Oxyfuel, and plasma torches are also used in brazing and welding applications. 
   Monitor / Controller       Monitor / controller equipment is used for sensing joint quality (size or integrity), gap, position, or output power supply variations. Controllers are also used to adjust parameters in order to compensate for variations in joint quality or output power. 
   Other       Other unlisted equipment types. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Process Capability
   Arc / Resistance Processes:       
   Your choices are...         
   Flux Cored Arc (FCAW)       In the Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) process, metal parts are joined by melting base and filler metals. An arc is struck between a consumable filler metal wire and the base alloy work piece.  The filler metal wire, or consumable electrode, is continuously fed and fused with the work piece.  FCAW uses a wire with a central core filled with flux, which usually eliminates the need for a shielding gas supply. Typically, equipment suitable for flux cored arc welding is capable of performing MIG processes and vice versa. 
   MIG (GMAW)       The Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process is commonly known as the Metal Inert Gas Process (MIG). MIG welding is also referred to as short circuit transfer. In MIG arc welding process, metal parts are joined by melting base and filler metals with an arc struck between a consumable filler metal wire and the base alloy work piece. The filler metal wire or consumable electrode is continuously fed and fused with the work piece. Externally supplied gas or gas mixtures provide shielding. In normal MIG, no metal is transferred across the arc; metal is only deposited when the wire actually touches the work. In spray transfer MIG welding, a stream of tiny molten droplets travels across the arc from the electrode to the weld puddle. Typically, equipment suitable for MIG welding is capable of performing flux cored arc welding processes and vice versa. 
   Multi-process       These welding units are capable of supplying the required power for multiple welding processes. 
   Orbital / Tube Arc Welding       Orbital / tube arc welding are specialized processes for circumferential arc welding of tube, pipe, or round bar where the work piece is held in a specialized fixture or rotated in a lathe during welding. 
   Plasma Arc       Plasma arc welding is similar to TIG (GTAW) welding except a more collimated plasma stream is used to fuse work pieces and/or filler alloys. The torch delivers a high level of heat to a small area, producing a high quality weld with a minimal heat affected zone. The tight plasma stream is created by initiating the arc and plasma within the electrode, then forcing the stream and arc through a small orifice and transferring the arc to the work piece. 
   Resistance - Flash / Upset Butt       Flash welding uses a series of flashes or arcs between two components of similar cross section and shape along with clamping pressure. Parts are attached to electrically insulated platens.  One platen oscillates to create flashing or arcing actions when the power source is connected.  The process is a combination of a melting and forging process that produced high quality welds.  Flash welding is widely applied in the aerospace industry. 
   Resistance - Projection       Projection welding uses a nib (solid projection) or dimple (embossed projection) in the material to preferentially concentrate current flow at a contact point resulting in lower currents, forces, and process times compared to resistance spot welding. Solids projections are designed into studs or nuts for projection welding of these fasteners to a metal surface.  Dimple or embossed projections are applied in welding sheet metal assemblies. 
   Resistance - Seam       Resistance seam welding uses rotating circular electrodes to create series of spot welds that form a seam. The quality of the seam weld varies depending on the nugget spacing or overlap.  Leak tight seams can be made if the nuggets overlap. High frequency power supplies are used in welding tube or coil seams since a higher percentage of current flows through the edges of a material at high frequencies. 
   Resistance - Spot       Spot welding is a process that uses the resistance heating generated at the contact point(s) or spot(s) to fuse and join to faying surfaces. Spot welding is widely applied in the assembly of sheet metal products. Spot welders can operate at high speeds and the units can be integrated into automated systems. 
   Stick (SMAW)       Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) or stick electrode welding is among the most widely used welding processes. The flux covering the electrode melts during welding, forming gas and slag that shield the arc and molten weld pool. The slag must be chipped or brushed off the weld bead after welding. The flux coating also provides a method of adding scavengers, deoxidizers, and alloying elements to the weld metal. 
   Stud / Nut Welding       In stud arc welding, the conventional welding stick or wire is replaced with a threaded fastener stud. The stud fits into the end of a specialized stud welding gun. An arc is struck between the fastener stud and the work piece, which fuses the stud to the work piece’s surface.  Drawn arc, capacitive discharge, internal resistance, or other processes are used to generate an arc or fuse metal. Similar processes can be applied to weld a thread nut to a work piece. In drawn arc welding systems, an arc is struck between the fastener and work surface. The fastener is lifted and then plunged into the molten material after a specified time. In capacitor discharge welding, a bank of capacitors is charged and then the discharged current is applied across the joint between the work pieces. Usually, one of the work pieces has a nip where arcing is initiated. The arc spreads radially out along the surfaces to be joined. Once the surfaces are melted, a pneumatic cylinder, spring, or another mechanical actuator forces the surfaces together. 
   Submerged Arc       In stud arc welding, the conventional welding stick or wire is replaced with a threaded fastener stud. The stud fits into the end of a specialized stud welding gun. An arc is struck between the fastener stud and the work piece, which fuses the stud to the work piece’s surface.  Drawn arc, capacitive discharge, internal resistance, or other processes are used to generate an arc or fuse metal. Similar processes can be applied to weld a thread nut to a work piece. In drawn arc welding systems, an arc is struck between the fastener and work surface. The fastener is lifted and then plunged into the molten material after a specified time. In capacitor discharge welding, a bank of capacitors is charged and then the discharged current is applied across the joint between the work pieces. Usually, one of the work pieces has a nip where arcing is initiated. The arc spreads radially out along the surfaces to be joined. Once the surfaces are melted, a pneumatic cylinder, spring, or another mechanical actuator forces the surfaces together. 
   TIG (GTAW)       The Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) process is commonly called the Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding process. The TIG welding process joins metals by melting base and filler metals with an arc struck between a tungsten electrode and the work piece. The tungsten electrode should not become part of the completed weld in normal operation. Filler metal is typically used and argon inert gas or inert gas mixtures are used for shielding. 
   Other Arc or Resistance Welders       Other arc or plasma welding process not listed here. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Cutting / Gouging?       Gouging machines or outfits providing arc, plasma, oxy-fuel, or laser cutting capability. An example would be a stick arc welder capable of using carbon rods for carbon arc cutting (CAC). 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Surfacing / Hard Facing       Hard facing is a process that fuses or sprays on a deposit, coating, or cladding onto an area of a base alloy. The hard facing alloy is usually harder than the underlying base alloy. Surface layers may also be deposited to enhance electrical or thermal properties, wear or corrosion resistance, or provide other special surface characteristics. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
Back to Top
Output Power
   Duty Cycle:       Duty cycle is the percentage of time a welding unit can remain on in a ten-minute period before powering-off to cool. This is done in order to prevent damage to components. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   Output Power Capability:       
   Your choices are...         
   AC Output       The current output varies over time sinusoidally with an alternating current (AC) supply. 
   DC Output       The current remains a constant value over time with a direct current (DC) power supply. 
   AC/DC Selectable       Selectable power sources can provide an AC or DC output as needed. 
   High Frequency       High frequency power supplies are used for induction welding and arc welding of aluminum or other alloys with a tenacious oxide skin. High frequency is useful in initiating an arc. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Output Current Range:       Output current range is the designed current range of the welding unit or the current range monitored or controlled. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Output Voltage Range:       Output voltage range is the designed voltage range of the welding unit or the voltage range monitored or controlled. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
Back to Top
Features & Technology
   Engine Driven Generator?       Engine-driven generator refers to gasoline, diesel, or other fuel-powered motor-generator welding power sources. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Marine Duty / Corrosion Resistant?       Machines are designed for applications which require resistance to water or corrosion. Examples include shipyards, mines, paper mills, chemical plants, oil fields, underwater welding, bridges, or offshore drilling platforms. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Multi-operator?       The welder is capable of supplying multiple operators. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Water Cooled?       The machine can use a supply of water to maintain the welding, cutting gun, or other unit components at a lower temperature in order improve the duty-cycle and reduce component over-heating or erosion. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
Back to Top