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Equipment Type:

Soldering Process:

Surface Mount Device / SMT Processing?

Output Temperature:

Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Temperature Stability (+/-):

Features & Technology:

Help with Soldering Irons, Stations, and Accessories specifications:

Equipment Type
   Equipment Type:       
   Your choices are...         
   Complete System       Complete welding systems include brazing, cutting, soldering, and/or surfacing subsystems. They also include a power source or station; a torch, iron or gun; cables, feeders, and positioners; robots; and other required components. 
   Soldering Station       Power sources or power stations are power supplies used for soldering irons, tungsten inert gas (TIG) guns, metal inert gas (MIG) guns, electrode holders, laser, electron beam guns, or other joining units. The required output power is enough to melt the material. Welding power supplies are sometimes called welding power sources. Soldering power supplies are called soldering stations. 
   Gun / Iron / Torch       Irons, torches, or guns provide a point-source of heat for melting solder or filler alloys at a joint or interface. Typically, soldering irons are heated using electrical resistance. Gas torch or hot air-heated irons are also available and are useful in plumbing or field applications where an electrical power source is not available. Gas burning, Oxyfuel, and plasma torches are also used in brazing and welding applications. 
   Monitor / Controller       Monitor / controller equipment is used for sensing joint quality (size or integrity), gap, position, or output power supply variations. Controllers are also used to adjust parameters in order to compensate for variations in joint quality or output power. 
   Accessory / Other       Other unlisted equipment types. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Solder Process Capability
   Soldering Process:       
   Your choices are...         
   Gas Torch       Gas torch brazing uses a combustible fuel gas such as propane and air or oxygen to heat the workpiece and melt the braze filler alloy. The molten braze alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface. Temperatures are normally high so that a metallurgical bond can be formed, but fusion of the workpiece does not normally occur. 
   Hot Dip Soldering       In hot dip brazing or soldering, the work pieces are immersion into a molten bath of filler alloy.  The bath heats the work surfaces. The molten filler alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface or is pulled into the joint by capillary action. Excess filler alloy runs off as the part is pulled from the molten bath. 
   Hot Plate       Hot plate welding uses a heated plate to melt components, typically thermoplastics. The surfaces to be welded are pressed against the hot plate, melting the surfaces. The plate is removed and the surfaces are pressed together. While the majority of plastic welding systems employ a direct contact or conduction heating, other plastic welding processes are available that use infrared, convective, or dielectric heating. 
   Hot Rod / Iron       The brazing and soldering process uses a heated rod or iron to heat the work surface and melt the solder filler-alloy. The molten solder wets and flows across the heated work surface. 
   Induction Soldering       Induction brazing and soldering is a process using an induction heating source to heat the work piece and melt the braze filler alloy. A high frequency power supply and induction coil induces current flow with the work piece causing internal resistance heating. The molten braze alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface. Temperatures are normally high so that a metallurgical bond can be formed, but fusion of the work piece does not normally occur. 
   Infrared Soldering       Infrared brazing is a process using an infrared or furnace heat source to heat the work piece and melt the braze or solder filler alloy. The molten braze or solder alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface. Furnace brazing or soldering is sometimes called reflow brazing or soldering because the filler alloy is pre-applied to a part and then reflowed later during the assembly process. 
   Laser Soldering       Laser brazing and soldering is a process using a laser to heat the work piece and melt the solder or braze filler alloy. The molten filler alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface. 
   Reflow Soldering       Reflow soldering is the process of remelting electrodeposition, solders shims, or plated solder deposit to cause them to flow.  Reflow soldering results in a bright surface where any non-wetting defects can be easily detected. The main function of reflow soldering is for quality control. Reflow soldering equipment may consist of or include a reflow soldering oven. 
   Resistance Soldering       Resistance brazing and soldering is a process using a resistance heating element to heat the work piece and melt the braze filler alloy. Contact tips or horns clamp onto the part and pass current through at a point adjacent to braze joint, causing internal and contact resistance heating. The molten braze alloy wets and flows across the heated work surface. Temperatures are normally high so that a metallurgical bond can be formed, but fusion of the work piece does not normally occur. 
   Rework / Desoldering       Rework or removal soldering is the de-bonding of two or more metallic surfaces previously jointed together with an intermediate low melting alloy (such as tin/lead or zinc/copper alloys), which is melted and re-cooled as the bond. The solder is usually vacuumed or wicked away after remelting. Rework or removal soldering processes include the remelting of soldering for repositioning of components or extraction of defective devices. 
   Ultrasonic / Linear Friction       In ultrasonic or linear friction welding, the workpieces are heated by the ultrasonic vibration or reciprocating linear-motion between the surfaces. The workpieces are clamped under moderately high forces between a welding tip and anvil. An ultrasonic transducer is coupled to the welding tip. Ultrasonic welding is considered a solid-state welding process because the work surface is not normally fused. The process can be used to join dissimilar metals and plastics. 
   Wave Soldering       Wave soldering is a widely applied mass soldering method for electronic boards. Wave soldering or flow soldering uses a molten solder bath with a traveling wave. Printed circuit boards are positioned so that the terminations just touch the solder wave, avoiding excess solder on the PCB.  Wave soldering machines consist of a fluxing unit, a pre-heater, and a solder wave. The pre-heater heats up the board and component termination prior to soldering activating the flux and removing any solvent or water from the printed circuit board.  The board is passed over a wave of solder which laps up against the bottom of the board to wet and solder the metal surfaces to be joined. 
   Specialty / Other       Other brazing or soldering processes not listed here. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Surface Mount Device / SMT Processing?       Soldering equipment is suitable for attaching surface mount devices to printed circuit boards or other electronic devices. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Performance Specifications
   Output Temperature:       The output temperature is the temperature that the soldering iron, tip, pot, or bath reaches. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Temperature Stability (+/-):       The temperature stability is the temperature control accuracy or the temperature level variation that the soldering iron, tip, pot, or bath can maintain. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
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Features
   Features & Technology       
   Your choices are...         
   Corrosion Resistant       Machines are designed for applications which require resistance to water or corrosion. Examples include shipyards, mines, paper mills, chemical plants, oil fields, underwater welding, bridges, or offshore drilling platforms. 
   ESD Safe / Static Control       The soldering equipment or accessory is ESD safe and will safely dissipate electrostatic charges and avoid static release to sensitive electronic components and personnel. 
   Multi-operator       The welder is capable of supplying multiple operators. 
   Self-Regulating Tip       Soldering iron or equipment has a mechanism to provide self-regulation of the soldering tip apart from a separate temperature sensor and controller. Self-regulating tips may take advantage of a component material's Curie point and subsequent magnetic properties changes to provide tip temperature control with the soldering iron or gun. One self-regulating system also utilizes an inductive skin effect. The skin effect ceases when the Curie point is reached and the current flows through a larger cross-section, which lowers the tip and iron temperature.  The magnetic properties of regulating core return when the temperature is reduced below the Curie point. This re-establishes the skin effect and I2 R heating. Another self-regulating mechanism uses a magnetic tip that loses magnetic properties at the Curie point and then disengages from the heating element. Other designs may use an integral thermostat inside the tip or iron itself that switches power on and off.  
   Water Cooled       The machine can use a supply of water to maintain the welding, cutting gun, or other unit components at a lower temperature in order improve the duty-cycle and reduce component over-heating or erosion. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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