See All Suppliers In This Area
Fill out as many options as you want. Click "Run Search Filter" at any time.

Overall Width / OD:

Secondary Width:

Overall Thickness:

Gauge Thickness:

Gauge

Overall Length:

ID:

Metal / Alloy Types:

Alloy?

Pure / Very Low Alloy?

Amorphous / Glassy Alloy?

Fusible Alloy?

Controlled / Low Expansion Alloy?

Light Alloy?

Metal Matrix Composite?

Super Alloy?

Soft Magnetic Alloy?

Standards / Specifications:

UNS Number:

Tensile Strength (UTS, Break):

Yield Strength (YS):

Elongation:

%

Tensile Modulus (E):

Processing & Finish:

Finish:

Applications:

Features:

Help with Ingots and Casting Stock specifications:

Size / Dimensions
   Overall Width / OD       This is the overall width or outer diameter (OD) of stock forms such as bars, plates, and tubes. Overall width is the average particulate diameter for raw materials such as powders, granules, and pellets. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Secondary Width       This is the secondary or minor width of profiles or structural stock forms such as angles, beams, channels, tees, and specialized or proprietary shapes. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Overall Thickness       This is the overall thickness of stock forms, tube walls, or other fabricated components. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Gauge Thickness       The numerical gauge thickness of the sheet, foil, or wire product.  Different gauge systems are used for different stock forms and alloy types. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Overall Length       This is the length of stock materials such as bars, rods, plates, and tubes. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   ID       This is the internal diameter (ID) or inner dimension of tubes or other hollow, stock shapes. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
Back to Top
Types
   Metal / Alloy Types:       
   Your choices are...         
   Metal / Metal Alloys, All Types       Search form for metal or metal alloy shapes. 
   Ferrous / Iron Based       Ferrous metals and alloys are based on iron. This category includes carbon steels, alloy steels, stainless steels, cast iron, maraging steel, and other specialty iron-based alloys. 
   Carbon Steel (UNS G)       Plain carbon steels are ferrous alloys based on iron, carbon, and small levels of other alloying elements such as manganese or aluminum. Carbon steels include soft, non-hardenable low carbon or mild steels such as 1020, as well as hardenable high carbon steels such as 1095.  Steel alloys are used in a wide variety of applications in almost every industrial segment. Mild steels and low carbon steels can be fabricated easily by machining, forming, casting, and welding. 
   Alloy Steel  (UNS G)       Alloy steels are ferrous alloys based on iron, carbon, and high to low levels of alloying elements such as chromium, molybdenum, vanadium, and nickel. Alloy steels include hardenable high alloy steels, high strength low alloy steels, maraging steel, and other specialty steel alloys. Steel alloys are used in a wide variety of applications in almost every industrial segment. Low alloy steels can be fabricated easily by machining, forming, casting, and welding. 
   Stainless Steel  (UNS S)       Stainless steels are highly corrosion resistant, ferrous alloys that contain chromium and/or nickel additions. There are three basic types of products: austenitic stainless steels, ferritic and martensitic stainless steels, and specialty stainless steels and iron superalloys. Austenitic stainless steels (AISI 300 / 200 Series) are highly corrosion resistant, ferrous alloys that contain chromium and nickel or manganese additions. Generally, austenitic stainless steels are more corrosion resistant than ferritic or martensitic stainless steels. Annealed austenitic stainless steels are non-magnetic. Cold working is used to harden austenitic stainless steels because these alloys do not respond to conventional quench and temper hardening processes. Ferritic and martensitic stainless steels are highly corrosion resistant, ferrous alloys that contain chromium and/or carbon additions. Ferritic stainless steels are soft, easy to form metal alloys. Cold working is used to harden ferritic stainless steels because these alloys do not respond to conventional quench and temper hardening processes. Ferritic stainless steels are formed to fabricate mufflers and other sheet metal components that require good corrosion resistance. Martensitic stainless steels can be hardened by a conventional quench and temper operation. Martensitic stainless steels are used for knife blades, tooling, or other applications that require good corrosion resistance combined with higher hardness and wear resistance. Specialty stainless steels and iron superalloys are highly corrosion resistant, ferrous alloys containing chromium, nickel, or other alloying additions to provide high strength or heat resistance. Duplex and precipitation hardening stainless steels belong in this category. 
   Tool Steel (UNS T)       Tool steels are wear resistant, ferrous alloys based on iron and carbon with high levels of alloying (hardenability and property modifying) elements such as chromium, molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium. Specific tool steel grades are available for die or cold work, hot work, high speed, and shock resistance applications. Tool steel alloys are used in a wide variety of applications that require wear resistance. They are difficult to fabricate in their hardened form and are usually EDM-machined or ground to achieve the tolerances required for tooling applications. EDM is an acronym for electrical discharge machining. This is a process that can cut small or odd-shaped angles, intricate contours, and cavities in extremely hard steels and exotic metals. 
   Cast Iron  (UNS F)       Cast iron is an iron alloy with high amounts of carbon. This category includes ductile iron, gray iron, and white cast iron grades. Differences in grades are due to variations in composition and processing. 
   Cast Steel (UNS J)       Cast steel alloy grades are produced by pouring molten iron into a mold. 
   Hardenability Specified / H-Steel (UNS H)       AISI-SAE H-steels are produced to specified hardenability bands. AISI is the American Iron and Steel Institute, a North American trade association. SAE is the Society of Automotive Engineers. 
   Mechanical Property Specified (UNS D, Structural)       UNS D steels have specified mechanical properties. 
   Other / Miscellaneous Ferrous Alloy (UNS K)       Other miscellaneous ferrous alloys have specialized or proprietary compositions or properties. Examples include maraging steels, high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels, and iron-based superalloys. 
   Non-ferrous       Non-ferrous metals and alloys are not based on iron and include alloys of aluminum, copper, titanium, zinc, nickel, cobalt, magnesium, tungsten, molybdenum, precious metals, silver, gold, platinum, palladium, refractory metals, as well as many other metals and alloys. 
   Aluminum / Aluminum Alloy  (UNS A)       Aluminum and aluminum alloys are lightweight, non-ferrous metals with good corrosion resistance, ductility, and strength. Aluminum is relatively easy to fabricate by forming, machining, or welding. This metal is a good electrical and thermal conductor. Aluminum is also useful as an alloying element in steel and titanium alloys. Aluminum alloys are versatile metals with applications in almost every industrial and commercial segment. 
   Copper, Brass or Bronze Alloy (UNS C)       Copper and copper alloys are non-ferrous metals with excellent electrical and thermal conductivity as well as good corrosion resistance, ductility and strength. Copper alloys are relatively easy to fabricate by forming, casting, or machining. Pure copper is more difficult to weld, cast, or machine. Brass, tin bronze, leaded brass, beryllium copper, and zirconium copper are examples of copper alloys. Copper is useful as an alloying element in aluminum alloys and powder metal based iron alloys.  Copper is a versatile metal with applications in many industrial and commercial segments. Copper's high electrical conductivity (100% IACS) makes it extremely useful in electrical and electronic applications. 
   Zinc / Zinc Alloy (UNS Z)       Zinc and zinc alloys are moderately low-melting, non-ferrous alloys widely used in the production of die cast components. 
   Magnesium / Magnesium Alloy (UNS M)       Magnesium and magnesium alloys are non-ferrous metals with low density (relatively high strength to weight ratio), good ductility, moderate strength, and good corrosion resistance. Magnesium and magnesium alloys are used in a variety of industries as well as in aircraft, marine, and power tool applications. 
   Nickel / Nickel Alloy (UNS N)       Nickel and nickel alloys are non-ferrous metals with high strength and toughness, excellent corrosion resistance, and superior elevated temperature properties. Nickel can also be magnetized. Nickel's properties result in the use of nickel alloys in jet engine super-alloy components, corrosion resistant chemical process equipment (valves, piping, and pumps), magnets and electrical resistance alloys, and heating elements. Nickel is also a useful alloying element in stainless, tool, maraging, and other alloy steels. 
   Noble / Precious Metal (UNS P)       Noble and precious metal alloys such as silver, gold, platinum, and palladium alloys are extremely resistant to corrosion and oxidation. Noble and precious metal alloys are used in electrical contacts, electronic connectors, chemical process components, catalysts, jewelry, and other specialized applications. 
   Gold / Gold Alloy       Gold has extremely high corrosion resistance, resulting in high-reliability electrical contacts even under light load conditions. Gold forms useful contact alloys with silver, copper, nickel, cobalt, platinum, and palladium. Major drawbacks are high cost, poor sliding friction characteristics, and low erosion resistance. 
   Silver / Silver Alloy       Silver has the highest conductivity of all metals. Its high conductivity, softness or low hardness, and high resistance to oxidation make silver an excellent choice for contact materials. Silver is strengthened with additions of copper, but this affects its conductivity. Fine silver is silver with very high purity (99.99% Ag). Pure or fine silver is too soft for most commercial applications, but is used as a starting component to form other silver-based alloys. 
   Palladium / Palladium Alloys       Palladium has good erosion resistance and high corrosion resistance with low material transfer.  Palladium forms useful alloys with copper and ruthenium. Major drawbacks are high cost and the development of high contact resistance films in the presence of organic vapors. 
   Platinum / Platinum Alloys       Platinum has very high erosion and corrosion resistance with low contact resistance. Platinum forms useful alloys with iridium, ruthenium, and tungsten. Major drawbacks are high cost and the development of high contact resistance films in the presence of organic vapors. 
   Iridium / Iridium Alloy       Iridium is very corrosion resistant and forms useful alloys with platinum and osmium. A major drawback is the high cost of iridium metal and its alloys.  
   Refractory / Reactive (UNS R)       Refractory and reactive metals include boron (B), tungsten (W), tantalum (Ta), molybdenum (Mo), niobium (Nb) / columbium (Cb), zirconium (Zr), hafnium (Hf), thorium (Th), vanadium (V), chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), rhenium ( ), and titanium (Ti). Refractory metals and alloys are metals with melting points above ~1750ºC (~ 32000ºF).  Refractory metals include tungsten tantalum, molybdenum, niobium, and zirconium. Refractory metals are used in high temperature, structural, electrical, and other specialty applications. Reactive metals combine readily with oxygen at elevated temperatures to form very stable oxides. Titanium, zirconium, and beryllium are considered reactive metals. Finely divided reactive metals can react explosively with oxygen and are often added to rocket fuels or combustible mixtures. A highly stable oxide film formed on the alloy surface provides protection against further oxidization or corrosion at low to moderate temperatures.  Reactive metals can become embrittled if there is too much interstitial absorption into the lattice of oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen. 
   Beryllium / Beryllium Alloy       Beryllium has the second lowest density compared to the common structural light metal alloys (Al, Mg, and Ti). Magnesium has a density of 1.74 g/cc and aluminum has a density of 2.7 g/cc. Beryllium's unusually high Young's modulus (287 GPa) is a useful property in structural applications. The high modulus and low density make beryllium alloys useful for aerospace applications. Beryllium has superior specific heat dissipation (heat dissipation per unit mass) compared to other metals because of beryllium's high specific heat and thermal conductivity. Beryllium also has a low thermal expansion coefficient (CTE). Many heat sinks and other thermal management products are fabricated from beryllium, beryllium alloys, and beryllium oxide ceramics due to beryllium's excellent thermal properties. Beryllium is also used to fabricate x-ray detector windows because it is transparent to most x-rays and gamma rays. Only characteristic x-rays from elements with lower atomic weights compared to beryllium are stopped or absorbed by a Be window. 
   Cobalt / Cobalt Alloy       Cobalt and cobalt alloys are non-ferrous magnetic alloys with high strength and toughness, excellent corrosion and oxidation resistance, and high temperature strength. Cobalt can also be magnetized. Cobalt's properties result in the use of cobalt alloys in jet engine super-alloy components, prosthetic devices, magnets, and cutting tool binders. Cobalt is a useful alloying element in tool, maraging, and other alloy steels. 
   Tungsten / Tungsten Alloy       Tungsten is a refractory metal with a very high melting point and high density. Tungsten and tungsten alloys are used to fabricate light bulb filaments, PVD evaporation crucibles, EDM electrodes, electrical contacts, and other high temperature components. The high density of tungsten alloys are put to use in penetrators and balancing weights. 
   Tantalum / Tantalum Alloy       Tantalum is an extremely corrosion resistant refractory metal. Tantalum can be fabricated by conventional methods due to the metal's good ductility and weldability. The corrosion resistance exceeds that of titanium and nickel alloys in many environments. Tantalum has a dark bluish gray color and is almost completely immune to acid attacks. 
   Molybdenum / Molybdenum Alloy       Molybdenum is a refractory metal with a very high melting point and a relatively high density. Molybdenum and molybdenum alloys are used to fabricate PVD evaporation crucibles, electrodes, electrical contacts, and other high temperature components.  
   Niobium / Niobium Alloy       Niobium is used in niobium-titanium alloys to make the low temperature metallic superconductors required for the powerful  magnets used in MRI units. Niobium and niobium alloys are used in nuclear and chemical process equipment applications because of the metal's excellent corrosion resistance in alkaline, acidic, salt water and some molten salt environments. Niobium has corrosion resistance and properties similar to tantalum, which is the most corrosion resistant metal.  Niobium falls into the group of metals known as refractory metals because the metal has a high melting point above 1750ºC. Nb melts at 2477ºC. Refractory metals are used to make components for high temperature applications. Some refractory alloys require coatings to resist rapid oxidation or scaling at high temperatures. In space or vacuum furnace applications, oxygen may not be a concern. In Europe, niobium is also known as columbium. 
   Titanium / Titanium Alloy       Titanium and titanium alloys are non-ferrous metals with excellent corrosion resistance, good fatigue properties, and a high strength-to-weight ratio. Titanium's properties result in the use of titanium and titanium alloys in aircraft or airframe parts, jet engine super-alloy components, corrosion resistant chemical process equipment (valves, piping, and pumps), prostheses or medical devices, and marine equipment. 
   Zirconium / Zirconium Alloy       Zirconium and zirconium alloys are used in chemical process equipment applications because of the metal's excellent corrosion resistance in alkaline, acidic, salt water, and some molten salt environments. Zirconium metal has high affinity to oxygen, i.e. a zirconium oxide has a high energy or heat of formation. Zirconium falls into the group of metals known as refractory metals because the metal has a high melting point above 1750ºC. Zr melts at 1855ºC. Refractory metals are used to make components for high temperature applications. Some refractory alloys require coatings to resist rapid oxidation or scaling at high temperatures. In space or vacuum furnace applications, oxygen may not be a concern. Zirconium's high reactivity toward oxygen has led to the metals use as getters (oxygen absorbers in vacuum chambers and thin film coating systems) and as pyrophoric components in explosive munitions and primers. Hafnium has properties very similar to zirconium, except in nuclear application where they are opposites. Zirconium alloys such as Zircalloy are an excellent tube material choice for containment of uranium dioxide pellets because zirconium has a low neutron capture cross section. Inversely, hafnium has a high neutron capture cross section (neutron absorber) is commonly used a control rod alloy in nuclear reactors.  
   White / Low Melting (UNS L)       Lead, tin, and white metals are low melting non-ferrous metals and alloys. Lead and white metal alloys are used as solders, battery electrodes, bearing liners, decorative products, and coatings. They are also used in other specialized applications. Indium, tin, lead, and antimony are used to manufacture semiconductors. 
   Bismuth / Bismuth Alloys       Bismuth is another low melting point metal used as a substitute for lead in solders. Bismuth is also used as a constituent in fusible alloys for use in fuses, thermostats, switches, barometers, thermal management products, tube bending, lens blocking, potting molds, wax pattern dies and punch anchoring, fire suppression water sprinklers, and workpiece holding. Bismuth is used as a strengthening addition in pewter alloys. Bismuth has a unique property in common with water; liquid bismuth (10.0 g/cc) is denser than solid bismuth (9.78 g/cc). Pure bismuth metal is the most naturally diamagnetic of all elemental metals. Bismuth has a lower thermal conductivity compared to all metals except mercury. Bismuth tellurides are excellent thermoelectric materials and are finding use in CPU coolers.   
   Indium / Indium Alloys       Indium is used to form several low melting alloys and solders. Indium is a substitute for lead low melting point solders. Indium based solders can "cold weld" because indium tends to be more oxide free, so heat and chemicals are not typically required compared to conventional solders. Indium based solder also reduces gold scavenging - extraction of gold from metal electronic contacts. Indium is also a constituent of Indalloy® (a registered trademark of Indium Corporation) Gallinstan® (a registered trademark of Geratherm Medical AG), Ga-In-Sn alloys, and mercury substitutes, which are liquids at room temperature. Indium is used to manufacture fusible alloys that melt at a specific temperature range for use in fuses, thermostats, switches, barometers, thermal management products, tube bending, lens blocking, potting molds, wax pattern dies and punch anchoring, fire suppression water sprinklers, and workpiece holding. Indium is a constituent of copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS), which is compound semiconductor useful in solar cell manufacturing. Oxides of indium such as indium oxide and indium tin oxide are used to form conductive transparent coatings on glass heating or defrosting and photovoltaic cell applications. 
   Lead / Lead Alloy       Lead is a metal with a low melting point, a high density, and low hardness. Lead and lead alloys are used in balancing weights, radiation shielding, battery electrodes, and solders. 
   Tin / Tin Alloy       Tin is a metal with a low melting point and low hardness. Tin and tin alloys are used in coatings, as alloying additives, in battery electrodes, and as solders. 
   Rare Earth (UNS E)       Metals or alloys are based on elements from the rare earth elements group. 
   Other / Miscellaneous Nonferrous (UNS M)       This refers to other miscellaneous nonferrous metals or alloy grades. 
   Specialty / Other Alloy       This refers to other unlisted, specialty or proprietary metals or alloy grades. These materials are based on a unique composition or alloy system, use a novel processing technology, or have properties designed for specific applications. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Alloy?       Alloys have significant amounts of intentionally added alloying elements or constituents. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Pure / Very Low Alloy?       Commercially pure, unalloyed, or very low alloy metals are free of or contain very small amounts of alloying elements such as copper and various grades of copper (e.g., ETP Cu, Be Cu, Cr Cu, Te Cu, Zr Cu); commercially pure titanium or palladium-modified titanium (e.g., C.P. titanium); and pure aluminum grades from the AA 10nnnn Series (e.g., AA 1000 to 1999). 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Amorphous / Glassy Alloy?       Amorphous or glassy alloys do not have a crystal structure, which results in their superior or unique magnetic properties, corrosion resistance, and mechanical and electrical properties. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Fusible Alloy?       Fusible alloys have melting points below 300 ºF. Eutectic alloys and non-eutectic alloys are the two major types of fusible alloys. Eutectic alloys compositions have a specific melting similar to a pure metal.  Non-eutectic alloys melt over a range of temperature depending on the spread of liquidus and solidus lines at the alloy's composition. As a result, non-eutectic alloys are a mix of liquid and solid phases and appear mushy or slushy. Fusible alloys do not have the high strengths or hardness levels of structural engineering alloys, but fusible alloys find many applications in manufacturing settings. Fusible alloys are used as anchors, work holders, dies, electroforming mandrels, tube bending aids, fire protection or sprinkler parts, encapsulation and potting molds, fuse parts, thermostat components, switch parts, thermal management products, lens blocking alloys, and wax pattern injection dies. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Controlled / Low Expansion Alloy?       Alloys are engineered to provide controlled or low thermal expansion characteristics. These low thermal expansion characteristics are useful in metal-to-glass or ceramic sealing applications. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Light Alloy?       Light alloys include aluminum, magnesium, titanium, beryllium alloys, and composites with low densities and high strength to weight ratios. Light alloys are useful in aerospace and automotive applications where reduction in weight can improve performance or fuel efficiency. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Metal Matrix Composite?       Metal matrix composites have a composite, reinforced metal, or alloy matrix filled with a second component. The second component of reinforcement may be in particulate, chopped fiber, continuous filament, or fabric form. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Super Alloy?       Superalloys are nickel, cobalt, or iron-based alloys with excellent elevated temperature strength, creep properties, and oxidation resistance. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Soft Magnetic Alloy?       Soft magnetic alloys are easily magnetized and demagnetized.  These alloys are used in motor, transformer, electromagnets, magnetic bearing, solenoid, GFCI, relays, generators, tape heads, and shielding applications in sheet, lamination, and core configurations. Depending on the specific application, alloys are selected based on their permeability, resistivity, core loss, and flux density or saturation characteristics 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
Back to Top
Grades & Specifications
   Standards / Specifications       
   Your choices are...         
   AISI       Iron-based or ferrous alloys adhere to designations established by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) and the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). Examples of AISI-SAE steel grades are 1018, 4140, 9610 and 52100. 
   AA / IADS       Metals or alloys meet compositional standards established by the Aluminum Association of the United States (AA), which classifies materials based on the International Alloy Designation System (IADS).  
   AMS       Metals or alloys meet specific Aerospace Material Specification (AMS) guidelines established by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). 
   ASTM / ASME       The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) is a non-profit organization that provides a forum for the development and publication of voluntary standards for materials, products, systems, and services. Most specifications from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) are adopted from or are very similar to ASTM specifications. 
   Casting Grade (ICI, etc.)       Ingot or alloy shapes meet the requirements for casting stock from the Alloy Casting Institute (ACI), the American Die Casting Institute (ADCI), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the Investment Casting Institute (ICI). 
   CDA       Metals or alloys meet compositional standards established by the Copper Development Association (CDA) of the United States. 
   EN       European Norm or EuroNorm (EN) specifications have superseded several older, national designation systems such as BS, DIN, NS, and SS. 
   MIL-SPEC / Federal (QQS)       MIL-SPEC metals meet U.S. government standards and are suitable for military applications. QQ and QQS are prefixes used to designate specific metals. 
   JIS       Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) specify the standards used for industrial activities in Japan. The standardization process is coordinated by the Japanese Industrial Standards Committee and published through the Japanese Standards Association. 
   SAE       Products meet alloy grades, specifications, or designations established by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE). 
   UNS       Metals or alloys meet the compositional standards in the Unified Numbering System (UNS), which was established by the ASTM, SAE, and several metal trade associations and societies. UNS identifies metals and alloys with a letter and five numbers. For example, carbon and alloy steels are identified as Gnnnnn, where G is the letter nnnnn is the number. 
   Specialty / Other       This refers to other unlisted, specialized, and OEM-specific (e.g., GE, P&W, Boeing, etc.) or proprietary material specifications. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   UNS Number         
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
Back to Top
Mechanical Properties
   Tensile Strength (UTS, Break)       Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at break is the maximum amount of stress required to fail or break the material under tension-loading test conditions.   
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Yield Strength (YS)       Yield strength (YS) is the maximum amount of stress required to deform or impart permanent plastic deformation (typically of 0.2%) in the material under tension-loading test conditions. The yield point occurs when elastic or linear stress-strain behavior changes to plastic or non-linear behavior. Ductile materials typically deviate from Hooke's law or linear behavior at some higher stress level. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Elongation       Elongation is the percent amount of deformation that occurs during a tensile test or other mechanical test. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Tensile Modulus (E)       Tensile modulus, Young's modulus, or the modulus of elasticity (E) is a material constant that indicates the variation in strain produced under an applied tensile load. Materials with a higher modulus of elasticity have higher stiffness or rigidity. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
Back to Top
Processing & Finish
           
   Your choices are...         
   Annealed       These metals and alloys are provided in an annealed or softened condition. Some materials anneal during thermal-mechanical processing depending on the process temperature range and alloy type. 
   Hardened / Heat Treated       Hardened or heat-treated metals and alloys are provided in a hard or hardened condition. Higher hardness or strength levels can be developed through work hardening (mechanical deformation), conventional quench and tempering hardening, aging, precipitation hardening, and other specialized heat treating processes. 
   Cast (Continuous, Centrifugal, etc.)       Cast alloy stocks or shapes are produced in a casting process such as continuous casting or centrifugal casting. 
   Wrought       Wrought metals or alloys are worked mechanically to refine their structure, break up inclusion, close porosity, and improve homogeneity.  
   Extruded       These alloy stocks or shapes are produced by using an extrusion process. 
   Forged       Metal stock or shapes are available as forged billets, blooms, slabs, or bar stock. The forging process presses, pounds, or squeezes metal stock under very high pressure. Material flow occurs during the forging process, closing any internal porosity and refining the microstructure. 
   Powdered Metal (Compacted)       Powered metal stock or shapes are fabricated by consolidating or compacting powdered or atomized versions of the metal or alloy. Powder processing eliminates the possibility of large inclusions and can produce a finer structure compared to conventional wrought processes. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Finish       
   Your choices are...         
   Anti-slip / Textured       Plates, bars, angles, or other stock metal shapes have a texture or non-slip surface such as an embossed diamond pattern or an anti-slip abrasive coating. 
   Coated / Painted       Metal or alloy stock or shapes are coated with a protective or decorative layer of paint, resin, plating, thermal spray deposit, or other organic or inorganic material. 
   Cold Finished / Rolled / Drawn       Alloy stock or shapes are produced in a process that mechanically deforms or works the material at a temperature that is below the recrystallization point of the alloy. Rolling processes squeeze the metal between two steel rolls. Drawing processes pull the metal from a die opening or gap. The elevated temperature allows a greater degree of deformation as well as annealing during the process. Hot rolled metals tend to have more scale on their surface. 
   Hot Rolled       Hot rolled alloy stock or shapes are produced in a process that mechanically deforms or works the material at an elevated temperature (e.g., steels in the "red" hot condition). This temperature is above the recrystallization point of the alloy. The elevated temperature allows a greater degree of deformation or a reduction of thickness. A post-annealing process is not required after hot rolling. Hot rolled metals tend to have more surface scale and require pickling and oiling. 
   Galvanized       Galvanized steel sheets and products are protected with an electrodeposited or dip zinc layer. The zinc and steel form a galvanic cell under wet or moist conditions. The zinc layer has a lower electro-galvanic potential compared to steel causing the zinc to be attacked and sacrificed while protecting the underlying steel. 
   Ground / Machined       The surface of the metal shape or stock is ground or machined, resulting in a better finish compared to the processed stock. The processed condition can be rolled, cast, extruded, forged, compacted, and sintered. 
   Polished       The surface of the metal shape or stock is polished or buffed, which provides a better finish compared to the rolled, ground, machined, or other processed stock conditions. Polishing uses fine grit, loose or fixed abrasive products to refine the surface finish to a mirror-like condition. Loose abrasive media could include abrasive slurries, polishing compounds, and lapping compounds. Fixed polishing abrasives could include lapping films, fine grit discs or belts, honing tools, and superfinishing products. 
   Other       Other unlisted proprietary, patented, or specialized finish, processing, heat treatment, or temper condition. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Applications
   Applications:       
   Your choices are...         
   Aerospace / Aircraft (AQ)       Products are designed and rated for use in aerospace, aircraft, airport, space vehicle, satellite, rocket, interplanetary explorer, and space station applications. Aircraft quality (AQ) steels and alloys are manufactured to aerospace industry AMS 2301 standard specifications of cleanliness, chemistry, strength and mill traceability as well as exacting steelmaking, rolling, and testing practices.  Mission critical and highly stressed aircraft parts are fabricated from aircraft quality (AQ) steel alloys. Aircraft quality alloys are also used in non-aerospace applications for highly stressed, mission critical components involving additional stringent inspection requirements such as macro-etch limits, magnetic particle, or other NDT tests for inclusions or other defects. Certified aircraft quality steels have paperwork indicating the alloy is what it is supposed to be and what steel mill produced the product. 
   Abrasive / Erosive Wear Protection       Materials resist damage by abrasion or erosion, and protect underlying surfaces from abrasive or erosive wear. 
   Alternative / Renewable Energy       Companies evaluated alternative or renewable energy production products such as photovoltaic (PV) cells, solar power systems, wind turbines, hydro turbines, and flywheel power systems. 
   Automotive / Vehicular       Products are designed and rated for use in automobiles, trailer trucks, trailers, railcars, off-road trucks and other vehicles. 
   Armor / Ballistic Protection       Materials are used to protect equipment, vehicles, and/or personnel against damage from blasts, explosions, bullets, and other high-speed projectiles. 
   Bearings (BQ)       Bearing quality steels and alloys are produced in accordance with ASTM A 534, A 295, and A 485. Bearing quality steels are produced under restricted melting and special teeming, heating, rolling, and conditioning methods to meet the rigid bearing quality steel requirements. Bearing quality standards typically applies to alloy steel bars and tubes intended for the manufacture of races and balls or rollers in anti-friction bearings, oil well perforating gun bullets, dies, punches, shear and cutting blades, and cam rollers. Bearing quality level steels are usually produced from standard alloy carburizing grades and high-carbon chromium grades such as 52100 alloy steel. 
   Battery / Fuel Cell       Material is suitable for use in battery or fuel cell as a collector plate, proton exchange membrane, or catalyst. 
   Biocompatible / Biomaterial       Biomaterials are specially formulated or designed to have suitable biocompatibility for biotechnology and medical applications. 
   Chemical / Materials Processing       Materials provide high temperature and/or corrosion resistance, making them suitable for chemical-processing applications.  
   Construction & Building / Architectural       Materials are designed or suitable for use in architectural, building, and construction applications.  
   Electrical / HV Parts       Materials are used to fabricate electrical parts for high voltage or power applications. 
   Electronics / RF-Microwave       Materials are suitable for electronics applications, including RF and microwave circuit, antennas, RMI and EFI shielding, and microelectronics interconnect. 
   Marine       Products are designed for use in marine applications aboard ships or in offshore settings. Uses include fishing, mooring, docks, jetties, platforms, piers, and ship construction such as hull and deck plates. 
   Mining       Alloys engineered for use in very corrosive and abrasive applications around mines and mining operations. Mining industry operation include excavation, water and slurry pumping, earth moving, and drilling under conditions where abrasive, corrosive, and erosive minerals, rocks, and soils are handled. 
   MRO (Repair / Resurfacing)       Metals and alloys are suitable for repair, hole or gap filling, patching, refinishing, resurfacing, and other maintenance and repair (MRO) applications.  
   Nuclear       Metals and alloy engineered for parts, products, capital equipment, or facilities used in the nuclear or utility industries. Nuclear grade stainless are manufactured to higher chemistry and cleanliness standards. Zirconium alloys such as Zircalloy are an excellent tube material choice for containment of uranium dioxide pellets because zirconium has a low neutron capture cross section. Inversely, hafnium has a high neutron capture cross section (neutron absorber) and is commonly used as a control rod alloy in nuclear reactors.  
   Oil and Gas       Metals and alloys are suitable for applications that can handle exposure to corrosive sour gases, erosive drilling and mining fluids, and abrasive minerals. Oil and gas industry applications entail extracting, synthesizing or processing oils, gases, or fuels such as well drilling, well maintenance, pumping, oil refining, re-refining, recovery, and recycling. Alloy products are designed and rated for use in oil wells and platforms, natural gas wells, refineries and in other energy exploration and extraction applications. 
   Pressure Vessel (PVQ)       Steels and stainless steels suitable for steam boiler, pressure vessel, and process reactor applications. Pressure vessel quality (PVQ) steels are manufactured to ASTM/ASME standards concerning chemical composition, mechanical properties, toughness, weldability, and hydrogen induced crack resistance. Pressure vessel quality steels are manufactured to higher cleanliness and quality standards compared to commercial grade steels. 
   Resistance Alloy / Heating       Metals and alloys engineered to have properties suitable for resistance heating element application. These metals and alloys are known as resistance alloys. Nichrome and Kanthal are common nickel based resistance alloys. Resistance alloys must have sufficient internal electrical resistance, high melting point, and sufficient elevated temperature strength. Resistance can vary with temperature and ideally the resistance is uniform in alloys to minimize variations with temperature or provide a linear change. In non-reducing, oxygen rich oven, furnace, and resistance heating applications, the resistance alloy must have high temperature oxidation resistance. In very high temperature vacuum and inert atmosphere furnaces, tungsten and molybdenum are commonly used.   
   Structural       Structural applications require ceramic components with a suitable strength, elastic modulus, toughness, and other mechanical properties. Metals can have much higher ductility and toughness compared to metals. 
   Wear Parts / Tooling       Wear-resistant metals are used in industrial products such as dies, molds, tooling, automotive rings, pump parts, valve seals/seats, stops, brake parts, clutch parts, and machining guides. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized or proprietary applications. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top
Features
   Features       
   Your choices are...         
   Corrosion Resistant       These alloys are designed or suitable for service applications that require corrosion resistance. 
   Cold Work (Die / Mold)       Steels and alloys are designed or suitable for die, mold, or other cold work service applications. Cold work steels have good compressive strength and wear resistance under room temperature conditions. 
   Heat Resistant / Hot Work       Alloys are designed or suitable for service applications that require heat resistance. 
   Shock / Impact Resistant       Alloys are designed or suitable for service applications that require shock or impact resistance. 
   Wear Resistant / High Speed       Alloys are designed or suitable for service applications that require wear or erosion resistance. 
   Air Hardening       These materials are air-hardened grades of steels or tool steels. 
   Oil Hardening       These materials are oil-hardened grades of steels or tool steels. 
   Water Hardening       These materials are water-hardened grades of steels or tool steels. 
   Austenitic       200-series austenitic steels are stainless steels that contain chromium, nickel, and manganese. 300-series austenitic steels are stainless steels that contain chromium and nickel. The stainless steels in each austenitic group have different compositions and properties, but share many common characteristics. They can be hardened by cold working but not by heat treatment. In the annealed condition, all are essentially nonmagnetic; although some may become slightly magnetic by cold working. They have excellent corrosion resistance, unusually good formability, and increased strength due to cold working. Type 304 or 18-8 stainless steel is the most widely used alloy in the 300-series austenitic group. It has a nominal composition of 18% chromium and 8% nickel. Type 316 stainless steel has an 18-8 composition modified with molybdenum to improve pitting corrosion resistance. Austenitic grades consist of 201, 301, 301, 303, 304, 304L, 305, 309, 310, 316, 316L, 317, 317L, 321, 347, and 348 as well as specialized or proprietary austenitic stainless steels. 
   Ferritic       Ferritic stainless steels are straight-chromium 400-series metals that cannot be hardened by heat treatment, and only moderately hardened by cold marketing. They are magnetic, have good ductility, and resistant against corrosion and oxidation. Ferritic stainless steels have chromium levels that range from 10.5% to 40% (typically 12% or more) and carbon levels less than 0.20%. Types 409, 430, 434, 430, 439, 442, and 446 belong in this category. Type 430 is a general-purpose ferritic stainless steel. 
   Martensitic       Martensitic stainless steels are straight-chromium 400-series metals that can be hardened by heat treatment. They are magnetic, resist corrosion in mild environments, and have fairly good ductility. Some can be heated to tensile strengths that exceed 200,000 psi (1379 MPa). Type 410 is a general-purpose alloy. Martensitic stainless steel grades include 410, 440, 440C, 403, 414, 416 and 420 as well as specialty and proprietary alloys. 
   Pearlitic       Pearlitic ferrous alloy have been slowly cooled to promote the formation of pearlite.  Pearlite consist of ferrite and cementite in a lamellar or layered microstructure.  Pearlite forms when an iron-carbon composition with a eutectoid composition (0.77% carbon) is slowly cooled below 727 C from an austenite matrix. Cementite is very hard iron carbide and ferrite is a softer, lower carbon, iron phase. Pearlitic gray iron is harder to machine compared gray or ductile iron grades with high levels of ferrite or graphitic grades. 
   Ductile Iron (Nodular)       Ductile iron or nodular iron is a special grade of cast iron treated with inoculants or alloying additions while in the molten state to promote the formation in is spherulitic or sphere-shaped graphite rather than flake graphite. Ductile iron is also referred to as spherulitic graphite iron or S.G. iron. Gray iron contains large amounts of graphite in flake or platelet form resulting in lower toughness but high machinability. 
   Gray Iron       Gray iron contains large amounts of graphite in flake or platelet form resulting in lower toughness, but higher machinability compared to cast iron with a nodular or spherulitic graphite phase. The fractured surface of a broken gray iron component has a gray appearance. 
   White Iron       White cast irons have very high levels of additional alloying elements such as chromium that increase hardness, corrosion resistance, and wear properties. The alloying additions promote the formation of alloy carbides. Chromium carbides are harder and more wear resistant than iron carbides. 
   Precipitation Hardening       Precipitation hardening alloys can be hardened by solution treating and aged to high strength. Precipitation hardening (PH) stainless steels are chromium-nickel metals, some of which contain alloying elements such as copper or aluminum. PH grades 17-7 (Type 631), 17-4 (Type 630), 13-8, 15-5, 15-7, as well as specialty and proprietary alloys. Many aluminum alloys are hardened or strengthened through a precipitation hardening process. 
   Duplex (e.g., 329, 2205)       The structure of duplex stainless steels consists of a combination of ferritic and austenitic phases. Duplex stainless steels have corrosion resistance properties that are equivalent to or better than austenitic stainless steels. Duplex stainless steels also have improved mechanical properties. AISI 329 and ASTM 2205 are examples of duplex grade stainless steels. 
   Boron Modified (B)       Steels are modified by adding boron (B). 
   Vacuum Arc Melted (E, VAR, etc.)       The metal alloy has been melted or remelted using an electrical arc in a vacuum chamber or vacuum arc furnace, and then cast into a ingot, billet or other shape. The vacuum protects the metal alloy from oxidation and contamination during the high temperature melting process. Vacuum melting can also remove undesirable contaminants through evaporation such as magnesium chloride in titanium sponge. Electric arc furnaced steels or E-grade steels are very clean and have less inclusions and lower variability. Aircraft, bearing, and premium steels are usually electric arc furnaced or E-grade steels.  
   Low Carbon / Low Interstitials (L, ELI)       Metals or alloys have very low levels of carbon or interstitial elements. Low carbon levels in stainless steels (L grades) improve weldability and the corrosion resistance of the welded joints. Titanium alloys with extra low interstitial (ELI) content feature higher ductility and improved weldability. 
   Leaded / Free Machining       Alloys contain additions of lead, selenium, tellurium, bismuth, sulfur, phosphorus or other free-machining additives that help break up chips during the machining process. Free machining steels include leaded steels(SAE 12L13, 12L14), resulfurized steels (SAE 1117, 1118, 1119) and rephosphorized and resulfurized steels (SAE 1211, 1212, 1213). Tellurium (5% Te) additions to copper increase machinability 20 to 90% while maintaining high conductivity. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
Back to Top