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Laser Type:

Laser Output:

Laser Wavelength:

Wavelength Range:

Tunable Laser?

Features:

Laser Power:

Pulse Energy:

Beam Area:

Operating Voltage:

Operating Current Range:

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Operating Temperature Range:

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CDRH Classification:

Help with Lasers specifications:

Laser Type
           
   Your choices are...         
   Alignment Lasers       Alignment lasers are lasers that create an extremely accurate reference point, line, or shape for aligning machines in industrial processes. 
   Carbon Dioxide Lasers       Carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers use the energy-state transitions between vibrational and rotational states of CO2 molecules to emit at long IR, about 10 µm, wavelengths. These lasers can maintain continuous and very high levels of power and are typically used in cutting, welding, etching, and marking applications. 
   Dye Lasers       Dye lasers use a dye solution as an active medium. Their output is a short pulse of broad spectrum content with a high achievable gain. 
   Excimer Lasers       Excimer lasers are rare-gas halide or rare-gas metal vapor lasers that produce relatively wide beams of ultraviolet laser light. They operate via the electronic transitions of molecules. 
   Fiber Lasers       Fiber lasers use optical fibers doped with low levels of rare-earth halides as the lasing medium to amplify light. 
   Helium Cadmium Lasers       Helium cadmium (HeCd) lasers are relatively economical, continuous-wave sources for violet (442 nm) and ultraviolet (325 nm) output. They are used for 3-D stereolithography applications, as well as for exposing holographs. 
   Helium Neon Lasers       Helium neon (HeNe) lasers have an emission that is determined by neon atoms by virtue of a resonant transfer of excitation of helium. They operate continuously in the red, infrared and far-infrared regions and emit highly monochromatic radiation. 
   Ion Lasers       Ion lasers function by stimulating the emission of radiation between two levels of an ionized gas. They provide moderate to high continuous-wave output of typically 1 mW to 10 W. 
   Laser Diodes       Laser diodes use light-emitting diodes to produce stimulated emissions in the form of coherent light output. They are also known as diode lasers. 
   Laser Diode Modules       Laser diode modules use light-emitting diodes to produce stimulated emissions in the form of coherent light output and include integrated beam optics and electrical systems. 
   Laser Pointers       Laser pointers are compact instruments that produce a low-power, visible laser light. They are often used for pointing out features on a projected visual display. 
   Nitrogen Lasers       Nitrogen lasers are an excellent source of high intensity, short pulse, ultraviolet radiation. They can be used as an excitation source, or as a pump for a dye laser. 
   Solid State Lasers       Solid state lasers use a transparent substance (crystalline or glass) as the active medium, doped to provide the energy states necessary for lasing.  Solid state lasers are used in both low and high power applications. 
   Other       Any other laser type not listed. 
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Laser Output
   Laser Output:       
   Your choices are...         
   Continuous Wave       The laser output is continuous. 
   Q-Switched       A device used to rapidly change the Q of an optical resonator. It is used in the optical resonator of a laser to prevent lasing action until a high level of inversion (optical gain and energy storage) is achieved in the lasing medium. When the switch rapidly increases the Q of the cavity, a giant pulse is generated. 
   Pulsed       The laser output is pulsed. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Laser Wavelength:       
   Your choices are...         
   Ultraviolet       The laser has output corresponding to the ultraviolet region of the spectrum.  Ultraviolet is considered the wavelength range from 1 nm to 390 nm. 
   Violet       The laser has output corresponding to the violet region of the spectrum.  Violet is considered the wavelength range from 390 nm to 455 nm. 
   Blue       The laser has output corresponding to the blue region of the spectrum.  Blue is considered the wavelength range from 455 nm to 492 nm. 
   Green       The laser has output corresponding to the green region of the spectrum.  Green is considered the wavelength range from 492 nm to 577 nm. 
   Yellow       The laser has output corresponding to the yellow region of the spectrum. Yellow is considered the wavelength range from 577 nm to 597 nm. 
   Orange       The laser has output corresponding to the orange region of the spectrum. Orange is considered the wavelength range from 597 nm to 622 nm. 
   Red       The laser has output corresponding to the red region of the spectrum. Red is considered the wavelength range from 622 nm to 780 nm. 
   Infrared       The laser has an output which corresponds to the infrared (IR) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Infrared is the wavelength range from .78 μm to 1000 μm. 
   Other       Other unlisted or specialized wavelengths. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Wavelength Range       The wavelength(s) the laser produces. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Tunable Laser       Tunable lasers have an external cavity that can be adjusted to emit one of several different wavelengths, usually on the ITU-Grid.  
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Features
   Features       
   Your choices are...         
   Array       Laser arrays contain multiple lasers.  
   Fiber Pigtailed       Lasers have an optical-fiber pigtail that is aligned and attached precisely for optimum coupling efficiency. 
   Internal Power Supply       The power supply is built into laser's housing. 
   Polarized Output       The laser output is polarized. 
   Thermoelectric Cooling       For better performance, the laser uses a thermoelectric cooler, a solid-state device which converts current into a temperature difference between two junctions. These thermoelectric junctions can be connected in series or in parallel to increase their overall temperature drop or power. 
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Laser Performance
   Laser Power       Laser power is measured in watts (W) and indicates the strength of a laser beam. A watt is one joule of energy per second. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Pulse Energy       The laser's energy per pulse. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Beam Area       Beam area refers to the area of the beam when exiting the laser. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operating Voltage       Operating voltage is the laser's supply voltage. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operating Current Range       Operating current range is the range of current over which the laser is designed to operate. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operating Temperature Range       Operating temperature range is the range of temperature over which the laser is designed to operate. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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CDRH Classification The Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH), a part of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), has a laser safety classification scheme.
           
   Your choices are...         
   Class I       Class I lasers are not hazardous for continuous viewing, or are designed to prevent human access to laser radiation. Class I lasers include both low-power lasers and embedded, high-powered lasers. Applications include laser printers.  
   Class II       Class II lasers emit visible light which, because of the normal human aversion response, does not normally present a hazard. If viewed directly for extended periods of time, however, Class II lasers can cause eye injuries. 
   Class IIa       Class IIa lasers emit visible light that is not intended for viewing, and that under normal operating conditions will not injure the eye if viewed for less than 1000 seconds. Barcode scanners use Class IIa lasers.  
   Class IIIa       Class IIIa lasers will not normally injure the eye if viewed momentarily, but present a hazard if viewed using collecting optics. 
   Class IIIb       Class IIIb lasers present an eye and skin hazard if viewed directly. This includes both intrabeam viewing and specular reflections. Class IIIb lasers do not produce a hazardous diffuse reflection except when viewed at close proximity. 
   Class IV       Class IV lasers present an eye hazard from direct, specular and diffuse reflections. In addition, they may pose a fire hazard and burn skin. 
   Other       Other unlisted CDRH classifications. 
   Search Logic:      Products with the selected attribute will be returned as matches. Leaving or selecting "No Preference" will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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