Technical Articles

Supplier:

Industrial Gas Springs, Inc.


Industrial Gas Springs, Inc. has published these technical articles:

(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
Damping is achieved regulating the flow of gas and/or fluid through the valved orificing of the gas damper piston. Commonly used compression gas springs when mounted in a rod down orientation achieve... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
Use standard gas springs rod down, i.e. the spring should be mounted so that it spends most time in a rod down position, within 60° of vertical, thus ensuring the seal stays lubricated. For tension... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
Gas Spring force is normally designated as P1 which is the force measured .2" (5 mm) from full extension in the extending direction. Force is a function of the charge pressure in the cylinder acting... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
Gas springs are high friction devices. Users will notice a spike in the force required to first compress a gas spring compared to the rated P1 force of the spring. If tested on a common weight scale,... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
All gas springs contain a small amount of oil to lubricate the main seal and rod and provide end of stroke damping (see damping). If standard gas springs are operated and mounted in a rod up... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
A gas filled spring consists of a precision rod attached to a piston moving within a sealed cylinder containing nitrogen at high pressure. Output forces are the result of the differential between the... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
As governed by Boyle's Law, P2 force is always greater than P1 force. During spring compression, the volume of rod introduced into the cylinder displaces an equal volume of gas, increasing the... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
The design of a gas spring can be modified to support applications requiring lower and higher K factors. Low K factors where the extended and compressed forces are almost equal are desirable on... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
All IGS springs, with the exception of the micro gas springs, are available with release valves (RV). RV gas springs are fitted with an internal aerospace quality valve located under the removable... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
The following chart gives the operating and survival temperature ranges for gas springs manufactured with standard, low temperature and high temperature seals. RV refers to "release valve" which is a... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
Once a gas spring has left the IGS factory, the only way to adjust its force is by removing some of the nitrogen gas contained inside the tube. Therefore the only possible adjustment will always lead... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
The procedure to adjust the force on a gas spring with a shrader release valve (RV) is similar to a T-Valve (TV). However, because the valve is more fragile you can only release gas using the tool... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)
From this Article:
The IGS Side Release Valve can be found on the Euroline range of gas springs. It can also be found on custom made gas springs where a SRV was specified. The advantage of this type of release is that... (View Full Article)
(Shock and Vibration Control Products)