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Dissecting the truth about automotive PHYs

In-vehicle connectivity is evolving to keep up with the advances of in-vehicle technologies. The increasing complexities of today’s vehicle architectures are introducing new requirements for those data links. Join this webinar to learn how bringing it to reality requires new approaches to the most fundamental element of the data link – the physical layer interface (PHY).



Date: May 21, 2019
Time: 11 AM EDT (8 AM PDT)
Duration: 1 hour
Presented by:

Overview

The automotive industry is in the midst of a technological revolution, and in-vehicle connectivity is evolving to keep up with the advances of these new technologies. The increasing complexities of today's vehicle architectures - supporting ever-greater functionality and the eventual self-driving cars - are introducing new requirements for data links. With the increased number of devices and ECUs in the vehicle, and the resulting concerns of weight, cost and complexity of the wiring harness, there must be considerable changes in how these elements are connected if future E/E architectures are to become a reality. Multi-Gigabit connections will be needed to form the backbones and high-speed data links for in-vehicle connectivity architectures. However, given the harsh automotive environment - which greatly challenges the deployment of such high-speed links - there is much debate in the industry over how all of this can best be achieved. Bringing it to reality requires new approaches to the most fundamental element of the data link - the physical layer interface (PHY). Different technologies employ different types of PHY, depending upon a multitude of factors including the physical medium used, link speeds and clock frequency. There are a wide range of available PHYs, each with benefits and limitations. Join this webinar to learn the important factors affecting in-vehicle connectivity, such as channel considerations, insertion loss, EMC and handling error rates, power and more, and compare two possible PHY signal modulations available for multi-Gigabit automotive links: PAM-4 and PAM-16. This will allow us to conclude how to reach the most robust approach for multi-Gigabit data links, while providing the necessary noise margins at the lowest power and area costs, for the ultimate data center on wheels.

Key Takeaways

  • Gain an understanding of how the wiring channel has a direct influence on which PHY technologies can be used
  • Learn how pulse-amplitude modulation (PAM) works and see a comparison of PAM-4 versus PAM-16
  • Understand the challenges of electromagnetic noise in the automotive environment and different approaches to dealing with it
  • Learn how layers above the PHY in the OSI 7-layer model can influence the complexity of multi-gigabit in-vehicle connectivity solutions

Speaker

Daniel Shwartzberg, Director, Technical Pre-Sales, Valens

As director of technical pre-sales for Valens Automotive, Daniel is responsible for ensuring customer success at the technical level, working with partners and customers on proofs-of-concept, and leading technical pre-sales discussions. Previously, Daniel led the company's technical marketing activities to define the requirements of the next generations of HDBaseT chipsets, both for the automotive and audiovisual markets. He also held a product manager position, where he was responsible for roadmap planning and implementation of the first and second generations of Valens HDBaseT integrated circuit devices. Daniel brings more than 20 years of experience, predominantly within the semiconductor industry.