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The Next Frontier for Medical Device Motion Controllers

Miniaturization allows a range of medical devices to be both portable and battery powered. Based on the premise that miniaturization is 'mission accomplished,’ what is the next big frontier for motion controllers? This webinar explores the topic with a panel of industry experts who will trace the past, present and—most important--the future of these devices, particularly in the medical equipment field.



Sponsored by:
Date: October 24, 2019
Time: 2 PM EDT (11 AM PDT / 8:00 PM CEST)
Duration: 1 hour
Presented by:

Overview

Miniaturization allows a range of medical devices to be both portable and battery powered. Advances in MOSFET and IGBT technology mean that motion controllers for Brushless DC and DC Brush motors also have grown smaller and less energy intensive. Motors are now so small that mere kilowatts of drive capacity are packed into a few cubic centimeters. Based on the premise that miniaturization is 'mission accomplished,' what is the next big frontier for motion controllers?

This webinar explores the topic with a panel of industry experts who will trace the past, present and-most important--the future of these devices, particularly in the medical equipment field. Bring your curiosity-and your questions to add to what is sure to be an insightful and thought-provoking webinar.

Key Takeaways

  • Gain insights into the key breakthroughs that have enabled miniaturization
  • Understand the current state of controller and motor technology for medical devices
  • Explore the range of possibilities as the "post-miniaturization" stage of device development advances
  • Understand the technical challenges that are top of mind for researchers and product designers alike

Speakers

Dr. Gregory Fischer, Professor, Mechanical & Robotics Engineering, WPI

Gregory Fischer is the William Smith Dean's Professor and a faculty member in Mechanical Engineering and Robotics Engineering with an appointment in Biomedical Engineering at WPI. He received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering in 2008 from Johns Hopkins University, where he was part of the NSF Engineering Research Center for Computer Integrated Surgery. At WPI he has been an integral part of developing the Robotics Engineering program and teaches primarily junior-level and graduate courses in Robotics. He is the founding director of the Automation and Interventional Medicine (AIM) Robotics Research Laboratory.

Kevin McCarthy, Chief Technology Officer, Dover Motion

Kevin McCarthy is Chief Technology Officer at Dover Motion. With 35 years of experience on over a thousand positioning systems, Kevin is skilled in all aspects of precision motion, encompassing their structure, guideways, motors, feedback devices, drives, and controls. He also has extensive knowledge in a variety of ancillary fields, including high vacuum systems, optics, fluidics, microscopy, and advanced metrology. Kevin received a BS in Physics from MIT, and for many years ran one of the two private companies that now form Dover Motion.

Prabhaker Gowrisankaran, VP of Engineering and Strategy, Performance Motion Devices

Prabh Gowrisankaran is Performance Motion Devices' (PMD) Vice President of Engineering and Strategy, responsible for future-proofing PMD and our customers who innovate in a fast-paced technology environment. With a degree in Electrical Engineering and an MBA in Finance & Strategy from Babson College, Prabh brings over 20 years of technology and product management, hardware development, and engineering leadership to the PMD team.