Engineering360 has asked its users about the latest design trends and features related to Gearboxes and Gearheads. They have also shared their product applications and tips on how to buy and use these products.
See the entire survey


Q:
What would your design or feature "wish list" be for this product?
55 answers
Answers:
High efficiency, no back drive from imposed loads, ability to modulate impact load to reduce fatigue induced failures, permanent lubrication, ease of assembly/dis-assembly by relatively unskilled labor without special tools and equipment, ease of inspection and assembly under field conditions, high strength and stiffness....and of course, low cost.
~James B, Professor, Huntsville, AL
No compromise in choice of material. No compromise in bearing quality. The gear box mounting platform has to be correctly pre-machined to make sure there is no additional stress or forces when mounting the GB.
~Marc Gys, Engineering Consultant, Tessenderlo, Belgium
Cycloidal disc with roller pin and rollers, with all rolling contact parts so that wear and tear is less than simple gears. Also in some range they have grease lubrication to avoid leakage.
~SATVIK PITHWA, Marketing/Sales, Ahmedabad, India
Hansen and Flender caters for a range of horizontal & vertical units that offer numerous features and a variety of options that is fine for now and the near future.
~Johann P, Condition Monitoring Superintendent, Secunda, South Africa
I wish that the gear boxes be like the modular add system, or mechano to select parts as per the required power and gear ratio, the voice level db to be determined. After selecting the required gear box, a live demo to be shown to the buyer, he can apply different input power to the live demo, and hear the voice level of the gear box.
~Falah A, Engineering Consultant, Musafah/Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
The designs change almost every few months. My wish list would be a design that uses less components, yet is able to deliver improved torque.
~Noel Brand, Logistics Controller, Johannesburg, South Africa
An automatic transmission with both a manual over-ride and maybe, while in the automatic mode, a selection for more aggressive driving.
~Bill H, Retired Engineer now engineering trouble shooter, Jönköping, Sweden
To have like cars industrial gearbox with the option of changing reduction ratio, by other means multi reduction ratio gearboxes.
~John Samir, Design Engineer, Alexandria, Egypt
Right angle and planetary: Higher output: 3-7 million inch/lbs output torque. Inline helical and worm more exact ratios.
~Mike B, Marketing/Sales, Vancouver, WA
Industry standard for output flange/shaft configuration, 'universal' motor mounting, stackable ratios.
~Chris Y, Automation Engineer, Hamilton, Canada
Small light weight independent transmissions for electric and gas powered personal mobility machines.
~George F, Builder/Contractor, San Clemente, CA
A competitively priced AC Helical reliable box with reasonable Service Factors - relative to the size.
~Cal M, General Management, Dublin, Ireland
It should be adaptable for everything with some minor changes. it should be compact in design.
~Praful Dalvi, Manufacturer, Kolhapur, India
To simplify the calculation of gearbox parts, necessary to design shafts, bearings, housing.
~Alojz Klobasa, Chief mechanical design engineer (crane design), Maribor, Slovenia
Better overall manual by meaning of more technical specs, example end play on the bearings.
~Engineering, Faculty/Staff/Student, Lephalale, South Africa
If possible, reduced size for high torque and compatibility with electronic devices.
~Ezequiel Salazar, Project Manager, Mexico
Ease of repair, minimal internal parts, common repair parts (bearings, seals, etc..).
~Ron C, Technical Support, Quesnel, Canada
Higher mechanical strength and efficiency resulting in smaller lighter gear units.
~Barry W, Engineering Consultant, Christchurch, New Zealand
Heat treated gears Oversized ball bearings Designed for high axial loads
~Charlie R, Design Engineer, Fallbrook, CA
Ultrasonic vibration detection built-in devices, low cost data acquisition.
~Anthony Rotundo, Design Engineer, Fairhope, AL
Low backlash, high efficiency, high stiffness, long life, compact size.
~David L, Sales Engineer, Santa Clara, CA
Small, light gearboxes for high temperature applications, 24/7 service
~Research & Development, S B Campo, Brazil
Better seals to prevent premature failure in washdown applications.
~Steve J, Design Engineer, Hayward, MN
New concepts in renewable energy area & hybrid automobiles area.
~Nitin K, Technical Support, Pune, India
Should be light carrying and easier to maintenance.
~Lokendra P, Engineer, Nimuch, India
@ minimum power max torque @ lowest speed with minimum torque
~Chandrakant S. Hadawale H, Design Engineer, Pune, India
- lightweight - fully sealed - chemical resistant housing
~Student, Star City, WV
Design with cost reduction, strength aspects.
~Manoj Panchal, Senior Manager --Design, V.VIDYANAGAR, India
Zero backlash, light, cheap and modular based.
~Architect/Builder/Contractor, Oslo, Norway
Build sheets and test reports for gearboxes.
~Patrick P, General Management, Vancouver, Canada
Quiet running, efficient, no back drive.
~Design Engineer, Oconomowoc, WI
With standard dimensions like motors...
~Ionel M, Design Engineer, Campina, Romania
To be able to obtain any ratio easily.
~Research & Development, CORAKI, Australia
Input/output shaft design flexibility.
~Ben G, Owner/operator fabricare plant, Manager of process equip, Natchez, MS
High gear ratio with very low rpm.
~CHANDRAPRAKASH D, General Management, NAVI MUMBAI, INDIA
Small size, low noise, low cost.
~Engineer, APO AE, DC
Smaller but with the same spec.
~Maintenance/Facilities Management, St-Hubert, Canada
Stronger and lighter materials.
~James Haldane, Technical Support, Black Diamond, Canada
Key way insert replacements.
~Dennis G, Project Manager, Paragould, AR
Stainless Steel Construction.
~Jeff W, Marketing/Sales, Chicago, IL
Low-low speeds to low speeds
~Research & Development, Lions Bay, Canada
Improve lubrication systems.
~Patrick C, Engineer, St. Elizabeth, Jamaica
Availability of bearings.
~Gordon Strachan, CEO. of a sub contract gear manufacturer, Arbroath, United Kingdom
Decrease gearbox noise.
~Product Engineer, Taizhou, China
Smaller package size.
~Mechanical Engineer, Rockville, MD
Expanded product line.
~Allan S, Marketing/Sales, Minneapolis, MN
More carbon fibre use.
~John C, Senior Partner, Inchture Scotland, United Kingdom
Minimal lubrication.
~Geoff Z, Engineer, Englewood, CO
Efficiency & Power.
~Engineering, Design, Missouri City, TX
Interchangeability
~Greg L, Marketing/Sales, Sydney, Australia
Lower noise levels.
~Peter R, President, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Cvt ratio info
~Other, Heltonville, IN
16 Speed GB
~Sreejith Kumar, Engineer, Chennai/Coimbatore, India
Smooth
~Zhao John, Marketing/Sales, Wuxi City/Luoshe Town, China
Gear
~Subbu Chitra, Engineer, Chennai, India

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Q:
Is there any advice you want to share with users to help them avoid common errors in selection or usage of gearboxes and gearheads?
46 answers
Answers:
Oversizing of the unit relative to the application. For example, if I calculate that a conveyor needs 2.1 kw of power at a given speed, I will generally add 25% and in this case would recommend 3kW. The client may then say that we should go for a 4kW. We then add a service factor of 1.5 based on the installed power of 4kW and the client ends up with a 4kW motor and a gearbox rated for 6kW - on an application that only requires 2.1kW. Also if the client can first establish the actual torque required - this can be a major help in sizing the unit correctly.
~Cal M, General Management, Dublin, Ireland
Speak to the suppliers. Confirm dimensions and data is suitable and confirm the data in writing. If in doubt, ask for clarification. Doing things in hard copy protects the customer and supplier simultaneously.
~Noel Brand, Logistics Controller, Johannesburg, South Africa
In German standard DIN 15017E, there are detailed instructions for how to calculate the peak torque acting on shafts, gear-wheels - if the max. value of acceleration-torque or braking-torque caused by motor, and due mechanical brake..... are known, as also the mass inertia of motor, shafts, coupling etc.
~Alojz Klobasa, Chief mechanical design engineer (crane design), Maribor, Slovenia
Car should be taken when one of the gears is broken, the designer should apply the tolerances and the QC should be very strict when accepting the manufactured gear, otherwise the whole gear box may be damaged.
~Falah A, Engineering Consultant, Musafah/Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Do not undersize, design for the environment that they will be used in; ie use synthetic oil in & proper seals especially in extreme temperature ranges. Check oil regularly and change as required.
~Jeff W, Marketing/Sales, Chicago, IL
Beware of accuracy claims, many are rated at zero torque. Also it is best practice to size a gear box based on the peak output torque of the motor attached to it, not to the application specs.
~Chris Y, Automation Engineer, Hamilton, Canada
Try to purchase gearboxes with common usage in your facility, not to have a unique one and to increase your spare parts stocks. Don't ever use locally manufactured spare parts, use the originals.
~John Samir, Design Engineer, Alexandria, Egypt
When enclosing a gearbox or gearmotor inside a commercial machine, examine your ventilation and avoid high ambient operating temperatures. This will enhance long trouble free service life.
~Pete R, Marketing/Sales, Mundelein, IL
Know what you need to accomplish as best as possible before sizing. Don't pick a motor first and then the gearbox. Select the gearbox first, then the motor.
~David L, Sales Engineer, Santa Clara, CA
Yes, you must be very careful about the service factor and the Agma class, those are the most common mistakes when choosing an equipment.
~Sergio D., Technical Support, Chihuahua, Mexico
Think 5 - 10 years down the road and est. if the service will remain the same as it is designed for. Design for the unexpected.
~James Haldane, Technical Support, Black Diamond, Canada
Yes, be sure that the fatigue life aspects noted above are considered. Don't just take the "Name Plate Rating" at face value.
~James B, Professor, Huntsville, AL
Do your homework, and double check everything, verify gear ratios and rotation and power required and power consumed ratings.
~Brian B, Technical Support, Mt Orab, OH
Be wary of stated load ratings and make sure your requirement is no more than 60% of the manufacturer's stated ratings.
~Charlie R, Design Engineer, Fallbrook, CA
Ensure that you have minimum amount of modification to your exciting equipment if you have to change a gearbox or gearheads.
~Patrick C, Engineer, St. Elizabeth, Jamaica
The basis to mount the GB shall be correct .. if that is not the case .. an avalanche of trouble will keep on coming.
~Marc Gys, Engineering Consultant, Tessenderlo, Belgium
Keepp the experts in the loop when selecting a unit, manufacturer reps know their product and applications.
~Ron C, Technical Support, Quesnel, Canada
If you don't know what you are doing, don't attempt changing anything. If you don't know how, get an expert.
~Bill H, Retired Engineer now engineering trouble shooter, Jönköping, Sweden
Take advice from consultant for selection of gear box. Do not take advice from dealer.
~Praful Dalvi, Manufacturer, Kolhapur, India
Ensure that the mechanical service factor is suitable for the application.
~Barry W, Engineering Consultant, Christchurch, New Zealand
Be sure of your input information and be realistic about your requirements.
~Greg L, Marketing/Sales, Sydney, Australia
Look for as much information on speed /torque relationships as possible.
~Peter R, President, Fort Lauderdale, FL
Exchanged oil supplier because some brand does not find on market.
~Student, Guatemala
Check the Gears and bearings. Where are they are made and materials.
~Patrick P, General Management, Vancouver, Canada
Do maintenance if you look after it, it will keep a life time
~Engineering, Faculty/Staff/Student, Lephalale, South Africa
Understand the torque needed and apply proper service factors.
~Allan S, Marketing/Sales, Minneapolis, MN
Although cost is important, never let it govern your decision.
~Chris S, Facilities Manager, Red Deer, Canada
Select in this order: Hp input, ratio needed, output torque.
~Mike B, Marketing/Sales, Vancouver, WA
Apply them properly. Don't overload the output shaft.
~Steve J, Design Engineer, Hayward, MN
Bigger is not always better, but too small is worse.
~Kirk W, Technical Support, Orangeburg, SC
Should not be bulky and standard combination drive.
~Lokendra P, Engineer, Nimuch, India
Cheap is not always the best purchasing policy.
~Gordon Strachan, CEO. of a sub contract gear manufacturer, Arbroath, United Kingdom
Use proper mounting procedure and alignment.
~Dennis G, Project Manager, Paragould, AR
@ lubrication should proper @ avoid overload
~Chandrakant S. Hadawale H, Design Engineer, Pune, India
Never under estimate the horse power needed.
~Anthony Rotundo, Design Engineer, Fairhope, AL
Verify service factors for gear tooth loads.
~Geoff Z, Engineer, Englewood, CO
Don't forget the "go back home" device.
~Eduardo L I, Marketing/Sales, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Users is not know about consumed power
~Manoj Panchal, Senior Manager --Design, V.VIDYANAGAR, India
Study and know the geometry of gears.
~Doug H, Owner ,Engineer some what retired, Portland, Naselle Wa, OR
Make some time to study the subject.
~Johann P, Condition Monitoring Superintendent, Secunda, South Africa
Pick right gearbox for application.
~Other, Williams lake, Canada
Compatibility must be assured.
~General Management, Osoyoos, Canada
Trust a good manufacturer
~John C, Senior Partner, Inchture Scotland, United Kingdom
Don't buy from China.
~Ray R, Technical Support, Lebanon, PA
Read manual
~Hsieh Ching jang, Purchaser, Kaoshiung, Taiwan
Spec
~Zhao John, Marketing/Sales, Wuxi City/Luoshe Town, China

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