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Output Current (Iout):

Power Dissipation (PD):

Output Voltage Swing (VOM):

Open-Loop Gain (AVOL):

dB

Supply Voltage (VS):

Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Gain-Bandwidth Product (GBW):

Slew Rate (SR):

CMRR:

dB

Input Impedance (Zi):

Quiescent Current (IQ):

Bandwidth:

Input Offset Voltage (VOS):

Input Bias Current (IBIAS):

Operating Temperature:

Allow up to: overrange/margin
Use the overrange/margin to restrict your search to items whose full-scale range is close to your requirements.
(Overrange/margin requires both 'From' and 'To' values to work.)

Operation Class:

Package Type:

Operating Range:

Life Cycle Stage:

Pin Count:

Number of Devices in Package:

Bidirectional Current Sense?

Current Limiter?

Complementary Outputs?

Integrated Reference?

On-Chip ESD Protection?

Rail-to-Rail Output?

Rail-to-Rail Input?

Single Supply?

Thermal Shutdown Protection?

RoHS Compliant?

ELV Directive?

Help with Power Operational Amplifiers specifications:

Performance
   Output Current (Iout)       Output current (Iout) is the maximum continuous current that can be delivered in the output of the amplifier. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Power Dissipation (PD)       Power dissipation (PD) is the maximum dissipation (in watts) that the amplifier can support safely. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
   Output Voltage Swing (VOM)       Output voltage swing (VOM) is the range of the output voltage. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Open-Loop Gain (AVOL)       Open-loop gain (AVOL) is the maximum amplifier gain when connected in an open-loop.  
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Supply Voltage (VS)       Supply voltage (VS) refers to the source voltage range. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Gain-Bandwidth Product (GBW)       Gain-bandwidth product (GBW) is a constant parameter which is equal to the frequency of the amplifier when its gain is unity. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   Slew Rate (SR)       Slew rate (SR) is the rate of change of the output voltage in response to a step input. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   CMRR       Common mode rejection ratio (CMRR) measures an amplifier's ability to reject input voltages that are common to both of its input terminals. CMRR is defined as the ratio of the differential gain to the common gain. Typically, this value is measured in decibels. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Input Impedance (Zi)       Input impedance (Zi) is the total resistance between the amplifier's two input terminals. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value greater than or equal to the specified value.
   Quiescent Current (IQ)       Quiescent current (IQ) is the current flowing through the amplifier when there is no load connected. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Bandwidth       An amplifier's power bandwidth or large-signal bandwidth refers to the device's ability to provide a maximum output voltage swing with increasing frequency. At certain frequencies, the output becomes slew-rate limited and begins to degrade. This frequency is the upper limit of the power bandwidth. The output voltage at this frequency is the peak output swing of the amplifier. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Input Offset Voltage (VOS)       Input offset voltage (VOS) is the differential DC voltage required at the op-amp's two inputs in order force the output voltage to zero. This occurs when no load is connected to the amplifier. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
   Input Bias Current (IBIAS)       Input bias current (IBIAS) is the average of the two op-amp input currents. 
   Search Logic:      All matching products will have a value less than or equal to the specified value.
   Operating Temperature       Operating temperature is specified by level (minTypMax) of the ambient temperature (in °C) in which the amplifier was designed to operate 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the limits in a "From - To" range; when both are specified, matching products will cover entire range. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Operation Class       
   Your choices are...         
   Class A       Class A amplifier designs are output stage devices that pass currents at all times, even when the input stage is idle. Since the output stages are always "active", presence of an input signal causes output current to be diverted directly to the loudspeakers. The slew rate is very quick and there is only a small delay between the introduction of signal at the amplifier's inputs and outputs. If all stages of the amplifier are biased in Class A mode, and the amplifier produces all currents at its output, regardless of input signal. Because of the full-bias-current-on state of Class A amplifiers, they are the most inefficient of all designs; however, Class A amplifiers are the most linear. 
   Class AB       AB amplifiers are a combination of Class A and Class B operations. An amplifier is said to be in Class AB operation if the amplifier operates in Class A for part of its output, and turns on an additional current for the rest of its output. The amplifier's slew rate is slower in Class AB operations than in Class A because there is a measurable length of time between the appearance of input signal and the appearance of output signal. The Class AB amplifier type is the most popular due to its increased efficiency and excellent linearity. 
   Class B       Class B operations are essentially the opposite of Class A operation. No currents flow when the output devices are idle, and thus must turn on from a zero-current state when signal is present. In addition, both output devices (negative and positive) are never active at the same time. If given a sine wave, each output device will operate for half the waveform. Thus, the Class B operation is very efficient; however, the linearity of the amplifier suffers when the signal approaches the point at which the output devices change. Class B operation amplifiers are not generally used for professional audio equipment, and are reserved for low-power operations such as radios. 
   Class C       Class C amplifiers are used for radio-frequency transmissions. This class is similar to Class B operations in that each output stage device (negative, positive) is turned on for less than one-half cycle, and pulsed on and off through the duration of the half-cycle. Class C amplifiers can produce large amounts of output power, although the distortion is great. RF circuitry has been developed and tuned to alleviate the effects of this distortion. 
   Class D       Class D refers to an amplifier design that is also switched. The output devices are switched on and off at least twice per cycle. Because the output devices (negative and positive) are completely on or completely off, no power is dissipated. Real-life Class D amplifiers are not 100% efficient, but approach 90%. 
   Class E       Class E operation involves amplifiers designed for rectangular input pulses, not sinusoidal audio waveforms. The output load is a tuned circuit, with the output voltage resembling a damped single pulse. 
   Class F       Class F amplifiers are RF and Microwave amplifiers. 
   Class G       Class G operation involves changing the power supply voltage from a lower level to a higher level when larger output swings are required. There are several ways to do this; the simplest involves a single class AB output stage that is connected to two power-supply rails by a diode or a transistor switch. This design is for most musical program material; the output stage is connected to the lower supply voltage, and automatically switches to the higher rails for large signal peaks (thus the nickname rail-switcher). Another approach uses two class AB output stages, each connected to a different power supply voltage, with the magnitude of the input signal determining the signal path. Using two power supplies improves efficiency enough to allow more power for a given size and weight. Class G is becoming common for pro-audio designs. 
   Class H       Class H operation takes the Class G design one step further and actually modulates the higher power supply voltage through the input signal. This allows the power supply to track the audio input and provide just enough voltage for optimum operation of the output devices. The efficiency of Class H is comparable to Class G designs. 
   Other       This refers to other unlisted operation classes. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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Package Characteristics
   Package Type       
   Your choices are...         
   DIP       Dual in-line package (DIP) is a type of semiconductor component packaging. DIPs can be installed either in sockets or permanently soldered into holes extending into the surface of the printed circuit board. The pins are distributed into two parallel lines along opposite site of the rectangular package. There are several types of DIP packages, such as Ceramic Dual in-line package (CDIP), Plastic Dual in-line package (PDIP), and Shrink Plastic Dual in-line package (SPDIP). 
   CDIP       Ceramic dual in-line package (CDIP) consists of two pieces of dry pressed ceramic surrounding a "DIP formed" lead frame. The ceramic / LF / ceramic system is held together hermetically by frit glass reflowed at temperatures between 400° - 460° centigrade. 
   PDIP       Plastic dual in-line package (PDIP) is widely used for low cost, hand-insertion applications including consumer products, automotive devices, logic, memory ICs, micro-controllers, logic and power ICs, video controllers commercial electronics, and telecommunications. 
   DPAK       DPAK refers to a type of transistor outline package (T0-252). 
   CSP       Chip scale package or chip size package (CSP) has an area that is no more than 20% larger than the built-in die. CSP is compact for second level packaging efficiency and encapsulated for second level reliability. CSP is superior to both direct-chip-attach (DCA) and chip-on-board (COB) technologies. CSP is used in a variety of integrated circuits (IC), including radio frequency ICs (RFIC), memory ICs, and communication ICs.   
   SIP       SIP refers to a single inline package. 
   SOIC       SOIC refers to a small outline IC. 
   SSOP       SSOP refers to a shrink small outline package. 
   SOP       SOP is a small outline package. 
   MSOP       Mini small outline plastic package (MSOP) products are packed in tape reel assemblies that include a carrier tape with embossed cavities for storing individual components. The carrier tape is made from dissipative polystyrene resin. The cover tape is a multilayer film composed of a polyester film, adhesive layer, heat-activated sealant, and anti-static sprayed agent. The reel is made of polystyrene plastic (anti-static coated or intrinsic) and individually bar-coded. Reels are placed inside barcode-labeled boxes for shipping. 
   SOT       SOT packaging refers to a small outline transistor. 
   SOT23       SOT23 is a rectangular, surface mounted, small outline transistor (SOT) package with three or more gull wing leads. SOT23 features a very small footprint and is optimized for the highest possible current. Because of its low cost and low profile, SOT23 is used in home appliances, office and industrial equipment, personal computers, printers, and communication equipment. 
   PSOP       PSOP refers to a power small outline package. 
   QFP       QFP is a quad flat package. 
   TO-220       Transistor outline (TO) is a standard package for discrete transistors. SOT package are JEDEC compliant. TO-220 is a TO package of size 220. 
   TO-3       Transistor outline (TO) is a standard package for discrete transistors. SOT package are JEDEC compliant. TO-3 is a TO package of size 3. 
   SC-70       SC-70 is one of the smallest available IC packages. It is used in cellular phones, PDAs, electronic games, laptops, and other portable and hand-held applications where space is extremely limited. 
   TSSOP       TSSOP refers to thin shrink small outline L-leaded packages. 
   QSOP       QSOP refers to a quarter size outline package. 
   PLCC       PLCC refers to a plastic leaded carrier. 
   UCSP       UCSP refers to an ultra chip scale package. 
   Other       This refers to other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary packages. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Operating Range      The industrial field in which the device will be used. 
   Your choices are...         
   Automotive       Devices support a temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for automotive applications. 
   Commercial       Devices support a temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for commercial applications. 
   Industrial       Devices support a temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for industrial applications. 
   Medical       Devices support a temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for medical applications. 
   Military       Devices support a temperature range and feature mechanical and electrical specifications that are suitable for military applications. 
   Other       Other unlisted operating ranges. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Life Cycle Stage      This is the current product lifecycle stage, as defined by EIA-724.
   Your choices are...         
   Introduction       Product planning or design is underway. Samples may or may not exist. Specification changes may occur and planned introduction dates may be delayed. Orders and product shipments are not permitted. This stage is not part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   New Product       Production is beginning to ramp up. Limited quantities are available. Orders and shipments are permitted. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Rapid Growth       Production is increasing rapidly. Manufacturing capacity is being added. Orders and shipments are permitted. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Maturity       Product growth has stabilized or peaked. Product quality is very high. Orders and shipments are permitted. Product is recommended for use in new designs. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Saturation       Sales and capacity have peaked. Orders and shipments are permitted. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Not Recommended (Declining)       Capacity is beginning to decline. Orders and shipments are permitted, but devices are not recommended for new designs. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Phase Out       Capacity is declining rapidly. A formal discontinuance notice may be issued. Limitations on shipments can occur, but orders are still allowed. Devices are not considered for new designs. This stage is part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Last Shipments       Final shipments are made for existing orders. New orders are limited to existing or residual inventories. Manufacturing capacity limitations may exist. This stage is not part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Removed       Devices are unavailable. Product inventories and all supporting hardware, software, and documentation have been removed. New orders and new shipments are not permitted. This stage is not part of the EIA-724 product life cycle data model. 
   Other       Other unlisted life cycle stages. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Pin Count       Pin count is the number of physical connection points (e.g., pins, pads, balls) on the package. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Number of Devices in Package       This refers to the number of devices in the package. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Features
   Bidirectional Current Sense       Bidirectional current sense amplifiers can conduct current in both directions. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Current Limiter       The amplifier has an embedded current limiter. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Complementary Outputs       The device has at least two outputs that are complementary. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Integrated Reference       The comparator has its own embedded reference voltage. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   On-Chip ESD Protection       The chip has embedded radiation protection. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Rail-to-Rail Output       The rail-to-rail output voltage swing is measured from the negative to the positive value of the supply voltage. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Rail-to-Rail Input       The rail-to-rail input voltage can vary from the negative to the positive value of the supply voltage. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Single Supply       The chip can operate with only one supply. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Thermal Shutdown Protection       The regulator has an embedded control circuit that shuts down the device when the temperature exceeds a predefined limit. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Standards and Certifications
   RoHS Compliant       Restriction of Hazardous Substances (RoHS) is a European Union (EU) directive that requires all manufacturers of electronic and electrical equipment sold in Europe to demonstrate that their products contain only minimal levels of the following hazardous substances: lead, mercury, cadmium, hexavalent chromium, polybrominated biphenyl, and polybrominated diphenyl ether. RoHS will become effective on July 1, 2006. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   ELV Directive       The End of Life Vehicles (ELV) directive requires that certain automotive products be free (except for trace impurities) of mercury, cadmium and lead as of July 1, 2003. Lead can still be used as an alloying additive in copper, steel, aluminum, and in solderable applications. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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