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Valve Size:

Pressure Rating:

Number of Ports/Ways:

Power:

Valve Type:

Single Solenoid?

Double Solenoid?

Media Description:

Help with Solenoid Valves specifications:

Specifications
   Valve Size       Valve size is the designated size of the valve by manufacturer.  This typically represents the size of the passage opening. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Pressure Rating       Maximum safe pressure value for which the valve is rated. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Number of Ports/Ways       Represents the number of connections or inlet / outlet ports to the valve. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
   Power       Represents voltage drawn during normal operation. 
   Search Logic:      User may specify either, both, or neither of the "At Least" and "No More Than" values. Products returned as matches will meet all specified criteria.
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Valve Type
           
   Your choices are...         
   Balancing Valves       Balancing valves are mixing valves that maintain a constant water temperature by balancing hot and cold supply lines. They are able to compensate for a pressure drop in either supply line and can maintain a consistent temperature. Balancing valves are sometimes referred to as pressure-balancing valves. 
   Blow Off Valves       Blow off valves (BOV) are used to blow pressure off the pipeline and in purging operations. Blow off valves are also used in the automotive industry to relieve pressure in the piping from the turbo to the inlet manifold when the throttle is backed off. When used in this way, they are referred to as compressor bypass valves. 
   Butterfly Valves       Butterfly valves control the flow of gas or liquid with a disk which turns on a diametrical axis inside a pipe, or by two semicircular plates hinged on a common spindle, permitting flow in only one direction. They are used as throttling valves to control flow. Butterfly valves offer a rotary stem movement of 90 degrees or less in a compact design. Unlike ball valves, butterfly valves do not have pockets in which fluids may become trapped when the valve is closed. Advantages include suitability for chemical services, small dimensions, and high coefficient of flow. Disadvantages include low cleanliness and the inability to handle slurries. 
   Cartridge / Manifold Valves       Cartridge valves are directional control valves that are inserted into manifolds to provide a cost-effective, compact system design. 
   Diaphragm Valves       Diaphragm valves are related to pinch valves, but use an elastomeric diaphragm instead of an elastomeric liner to separate the flow stream from the closure element. Instead of pinching the liner closed to provide shut-off, the diaphragm is pushed into contact with the bottom of the valve body.  Diaphragm valves are excellent for controlling the flow of fluids which contain suspended solids. They also offer the flexibility of installation in any position. Diaphragm valves are used widely in the pharmaceutical, food processing, and water treatment industries. Advantages include cleanliness and tight shut-off. Disadvantages include low pressure and temperature limits, and multi-turn operation. 
   Directional Valves       Directional valves direct or prevent flow through selected passages. 
   Diverter Valves       Diverter valves change the direction of the flow of a medium to two or more different directions. 
   Drain Valves       Drain valves allow the removal of surplus fluid from a system or container. 
   Gate / Knife Valves       Gate or knife valves are linear motion valves in which a flat closure element slides into the flow stream to provide shut-off. Gate valves are usually divided into two types: parallel and wedge-shaped. The parallel gate valve uses a flat disc gate between two parallel seats, upstream and downstream. Knife valves are of this type, but with a sharp edge on the bottom of the gate to shear entrained solids or separate slurries. Advantages include the ability to cut through slurries. Large sizes are commonly available. Disadvantages include pressure limitations, lack of cleanliness, and low shut-off. 
   Mixing Valves       Mixing valves combine the flows of two or more inlets into a single outlet for applications such as temperature or concentration control. 
   Metering Valves       Metering valves are capable of accurately controlling the flow of a fluid. 
   Needle Valves       Needle valves have a slender, tapered point at the end of the valve stem that is lowered through the seat to restrict or block flow.  Fluid flowing through the valve turns 90 degrees and passes through an orifice that is the seat for a rod with a cone shaped tip. These small valves are widely used to accurately regulate the flow of liquids and gases at low flow rates. The fine threading of the stem and the large seat area allow for precise resistance to flow. Advantages: Precise control. Disadvantages: low-pressure limitations, no slurries. 
   Pilot Valves       Pilot valves are small valves that are used to operate larger valves. They generally require less applied power to turn the larger valve than if the larger valve was operated independently. Solenoid valves are often used as pilot valves. 
   Pinch Valves       Pinch valves include any valve with a flexible elastomer body that can be pinched closed, cutting off flow, using a mechanism or fluid pressure. Pinch valves are full bore, linear action valves so they can be used in both an off/on manner or in a variable position or throttling service. Some typical applications for pinch valves are medical, pharmaceutical, wastewater, slurries, pulp, powder and pellets. They can effectively control the flow of both abrasives and corrosives, as there is no contact between metal parts and the transport media. Advantages: Streamlined flow, high coefficient of flow. Disadvantages: limited materials, low shut-off capabilities, low pressure limits. 
   Plug Valves       Plug valves, also called cock or stop-cock valves, date back to ancient times, where they were developed for use in citywide Roman plumbing systems. Today, they remain one of the most widely used valves for both on/off and throttling services.  Their design is fairly simple; the body is comprised of three main parts: body, cover and plug.  The plug is a cylindrical, tapered, or generally cone-shaped device that can be raised or lowered within the seat to maintain, restrict or completely shut off flow.  The valve is opened by rotation with the plug itself being the only element that is capable of movement. Advantages: Easy operation, medium to high flow, good shut off. Disadvantages: Low cleanliness, inability to handle slurry. 
   Poppet Valves       Poppet valves open and close ports with a sealing device composed of a disk, cone, or sphere that is pressed against the seating surface using a spring. 
   Pressure Relief Valves       Pressure relief valves are self-actuated safety valves designed to relieve excess upstream pressure from the line. 
   Safety Valves       Safety valves contain a thermal sensing component that opens or closes in response to temperature changes or close a line and stop the flow of material when a pre-set condition occurs. 
   Spool Valves       Spool valves use a rotary or piston-like spool for actuation. The spool, or spools, rotate or slide back and forth to block and uncover ports in the housing. 
   Shut Off Valves       Shut off valves close a line to stop the flow of material when a pre-set condition occurs such as excess flow or a pressure pulse from a broken line or a temperature change from an idle burner. 
   Other       Other proprietary, specialized, or unlisted applications. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
   Single Solenoid       Single-solenoid valves have one inner coil. Energizing the solenoid changes flow direction, and de-energizing returns flow to the former state. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
   Double Solenoid       Double-solenoid valves have two inner coils. Energizing one solenoid moves the cylinder in one direction. Energizing the other solenoid moves the cylinder in the opposite direction.  De-energizing both solenoids will leave valve in current position. 
   Search Logic:      "Required" and "Must Not Have" criteria limit returned matches as specified. Products with optional attributes will be returned for either choice.
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Media Description
           
   Your choices are...         
   Air       The valve can handle all types of non-pressurized air. 
   Compressed Air       Compressed air is under a pressure greater than atmosphere. 
   Water       Any type of water. 
   Hot Water       Water that has been heated. 
   Cold Water       Unheated water to cool. 
   Ground Water       Ground water is untreated water that is found on or collects freely on the ground.  
   Potable Water       Potable water is considered safe and fit for human consumption, culinary and domestic purposes and meets the requirements of the health authority having jurisdiction. 
   Salt Water       Water has a high concentration of salt, often from the ocean or sea. 
   Wastewater       Wastewater is the spent or used water of a community or industry that contains dissolved and suspended matter. 
   Gas (general)       Any type of gas, although generally excluding air. 
   Gasoline / Diesel Fuel       Gasoline / diesel fuel is a mixture of flammable liquid hydrocarbons derived chiefly from crude petroleum and used as a fuel for internal-combustion engines. 
   High Purity Gas       High purity gas is designated by manufacturer as being applicable and built for high purity applications - includes nitrogen, argon, oxygen, hydrogen, and H.P. mixtures. 
   LP - Gas       Liquefied petroleum is a gas containing specific hydrocarbons that are gaseous under normal atmospheric conditions, but can be liquefied under moderate pressure and temperatures. Propane and butane are examples. 
   Natural Gas       Natural gases are liquid hydrocarbon mixtures that are gaseous at reservoir temperatures and pressures, but are recoverable by condensation or absorption. 
   Sour Gas       Sour gas is hydrogen sulfide (H2S) laden gas. 
   Specialty / Corrosive Gases       Specialty corrosive gases. 
   Hydraulic Fluid       Hydraulic valves contain and transfer the flow and pressure of hydraulic fluid in hydraulic power systems. They range from simple shutoff valves to precise control valves used in motion control systems. 
   Powder / Solids       Media in solid or powder state. 
   Steam       Water in a gaseous state at a temperature above its boiling point. 
   Other       Other unlisted, specialized, or proprietary media. 
   Search Logic:      All products with ANY of the selected attributes will be returned as matches. Leaving all boxes unchecked will not limit the search criteria for this question; products with all attribute options will be returned as matches.
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